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There has always been lots of contraversy[QDMwise} about which bucks do the breeding of does in a herd.I have heard from Experts and ordinary folk that older 3.5,4.5 and older do the breeding for the herd.But I heard seen otherwise.I've see forkhorns,6pts,and spikes breeding does.How can you practice QDM with this happening?And also,..Does a young buck not have same genetics as a older buck in the same gene pool?Do his bloodlines not produce good bucks untill he is older?I am not a Biologist by any means.I have heard other hunters talk about this subject since I was a kid.What your thoughts about this?
 

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The most agressive buck usually gets breeding rights. But does will breed multiple bucks. I have read article where they did DNA tests on two fawns from the same mother having two different fathers.

Have you ever seen a doe pursued by multiple bucks? It's quite a sight.as they run her and run her. when she is ready she'll stand.

Your right a young buck regardless of headgear carries DNA from his father and MOTHER and will determine his potential size. Nutrition and age will only tell what he will be.
 

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Does this mean there are too many Doe Deer in the herd?Therefore the older bucks can't breed all the Does as they come in heat?
IMO somewhat.........

I always use this analogy..............if you put a few boys in a all girl school ......the boys wouldnt have to go far to find a willing girl.

I mean the bucks don't have to roam all that much to find does.
I don't see near as many roamers like I used to. Not older bucks at least.

On opening morning this year I took a good buck that was roaming but didnt see many more good ones roaming alone...........seeking out does.

Plus the deer have such thick cover in the southern areas of the state that they can breed and live in thick unhuntable areas. Making them hard to hunt.
 

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I've always been told by my Elder-hunters that little bucks breeding Does was a bad thing.I tell them that they will get older and its still the same buck.
I will never convince them otherwise.
 

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A buck's genes are established at conception. His offspring have the same genetic potential regardless of how old he is when he breeds. The reason it is undesirable to have young bucks breeding is that this means there isn't enough competition for breeding rights. Having competition for breeding rights ensures that the best physical specimens are the ones that do the breeding. This is, in part, how the whole survival of the fittest thing works.
 

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a few thoughts here .....

it seems to me that the does do NOT like being bred by young bucks. They run from there, thus the frantic chase scenes that we oft see during the rut.

does will let it happen but I nature is geared that the older bucks do the breeding unless there aren't any around.

maybe young bucks aren't as potent as older bucks ? maybe they don't do as well a job at it ?
 

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Quoted...
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Fortunately, Randy’s and Anna Bess’s research also revealed that even though young bucks do some of the breeding, mature bucks do most of it in populations with good age structure. Their research showed bucks 3½ years of age and older sired 70 and 85 percent of fawns, respectively, in populations with reasonable age structure and sex ratios. Thus, all yearlings and 2½-year-olds collectively only sired 15 to 30 percent of the fawns. This is much better than when yearlings and 2½-year-olds comprise 80 to 90 percent of the buck population, such as under many traditional deer management programs, and would thus sire nearly all fawns.

http://www.nhfday.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=108&Itemid=87
 

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I've always been told by my Elder-hunters that little bucks breeding Does was a bad thing.I tell them that they will get older and its still the same buck.
I will never convince them otherwise.

I would much rather see a 1.5 year old 6pt breeding doe then a 5.5 year old 8pt. If the elder is peaking at 8pts he obviously genetically inferior to the young buck with 6pts.

Regardless of what age the male, or female is for that matter, the genetics are the same.
 

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http://www.nhfday.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=108


Dominant bucks don’t monopolize the breeding, and they don’t even sire all of the fawns from each doe they breed. Black bear biologists have known for years that a litter of cubs could easily have more than one father, but multiple paternity in whitetails is relatively new information. Randy and his colleagues were the first to report on this. Their study of captive deer revealed multiple paternity occurred in about 24 percent of compound litters. Approximately one in four sets of twins or triplets had two fathers! This means does are breeding with multiple bucks, which further clarifies that individual whitetail bucks do not monopolize breeding.

Anna Bess then documented the first cases of multiple paternity in free-ranging whitetails. She reported multiple paternity in 22 percent of twins, a percentage similar to Randy’s findings. She also noted bucks that jointly sired twins appeared to be at least one year apart in age (A word of caution, though: these deer were aged using tooth-wear criteria. Recent research suggests this technique can have an error factor of plus or minus at least one year for older age classes).

There are several explanations for the joint siring. Remember, bucks will repeatedly breed does during the 24 to 36 hours they are in estrous. It is plausible in cases of multiple paternity that a buck breeds a receptive doe and then gets displaced or run off by a larger, older or more aggressive buck while the doe is still receptive. The larger/older/more aggressive buck then breeds the doe, and the doe can have fawns sired by each of the bucks.

The initial breeder may have been a young buck who was in the right place at the right time before getting displaced by an older buck, or he may have been the most dominant buck in the area but was “run down” from prior breeding activity and was displaced by a more aggressive animal. It is also possible for the doe to breed with other bucks.

Behavioral observations and genetic studies clearly show all breeding sequences do not result in conception.

So where does this leave you and your management program? You need to recognize bucks of all age classes will breed does. This is good because it ensures genetic diversity and fitness. As long as adult sex ratios are relatively balanced, it also ensures most does are bred during their first estrous cycle. This timing is crucial to ensure that fawns will be born during optimal fawning dates the following spring – when natural forages for the nursing doe and the weaning fawn are abundant, and fawns have more time to grow before the onset of winter.

This doesn’t mean you can’t intensify the rutting activity in your area or minimize the number of does bred by young bucks. Older bucks generally make more rubs and scrapes, engage in more fights and increase the overall rutting activity in an area. These can all enhance the quality of your hunting experience.


A little more from CP's link. A good read but nothing I didnt already know!
 

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I would much rather see a 1.5 year old 6pt breeding doe then a 5.5 year old 8pt. If the elder is peaking at 8pts he obviously genetically inferior to the young buck with 6pts.

Regardless of what age the male, or female is for that matter, the genetics are the same.
A little story thats true. A friend that just happens to be married to my cousin......a southern thing:wink:

Had a pet deer that was a buck. A very nice 8 pt for about 5 years and then at 6 the deer went massive non typical. This thing was huge I recall about 23 countable points.
I learned then to not discount a bucks potential from one year to the next.

The mother has a 50% say in the offsprings potential and how do we determine that?
Besides how do you control what deer breeds what deer unless you contain them?
Let nature and the deer take care of it.:biggrin:
 

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Quoted...
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Fortunately, Randy’s and Anna Bess’s research also revealed that even though young bucks do some of the breeding, mature bucks do most of it in populations with good age structure. Their research showed bucks 3½ years of age and older sired 70 and 85 percent of fawns, respectively, in populations with reasonable age structure and sex ratios. Thus, all yearlings and 2½-year-olds collectively only sired 15 to 30 percent of the fawns. This is much better than when yearlings and 2½-year-olds comprise 80 to 90 percent of the buck population, such as under many traditional deer management programs, and would thus sire nearly all fawns.

http://www.nhfday.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=108&Itemid=87

That last sentence sounds a lot like our state doesn't it?

hd
 
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