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I attended the update this morning at Jasper. It is much worse than they first thought. They have found CWD in yearling fawns, thus the thought that it has been around for 10+ years. They will be looking for road kills and sick deer south to Conway county, east to Baxter county. These includes the Missouri and Oklahoma state line. So, the whole state of Arkansas could see outbreaks due to the time frame that this disease has been in place.
 

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Well that's Dave's mistake, I do enjoy turkeys squirrels and fishing. This area is pretty solid across the board for those critters. Mother Nature isn't always nice. The deer will be fine. Yeah you'll see a decline but it's not the end of the world.
 

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I attended the update this morning at Jasper. It is much worse than they first thought. They have found CWD in yearling fawns, thus the thought that it has been around for 10+ years. They will be looking for road kills and sick deer south to Conway county, east to Baxter county. These includes the Missouri and Oklahoma state line. So, the whole state of Arkansas could see outbreaks due to the time frame that this disease has been in place.
How does finding it in a fawn make them believe it's been here 10+ years?
 

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He went on to say that five of the 18 deer that tested positive this week were fawns, which he described as less than a year old.

Carner said doe deer don’t pass the disease to offspring invitro, so those results show the fawns were exposed to the disease in a short period of time after birth. In addition, it will be six months from the time a fawn is exposed until it will test positive for CWD.

Carner said all that data shows the mass-kill technique to manage spread of the disease will have to change.

“We’ve been advanced 10 or 15 years from where we hoped we’d be,” he said.
 

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He went on to say that five of the 18 deer that tested positive this week were fawns, which he described as less than a year old.

Carner said doe deer don’t pass the disease to offspring invitro, so those results show the fawns were exposed to the disease in a short period of time after birth. In addition, it will be six months from the time a fawn is exposed until it will test positive for CWD.

Carner said all that data shows the mass-kill technique to manage spread of the disease will have to change.

“We’ve been advanced 10 or 15 years from where we hoped we’d be,” he said.
Ok...that's not the same as saying It has been here for 10-15 years...(although it may have...who knows...and that sort of data can't tell us that). It's more like saying things are so much worse than they hoped it would be even 10-15 years from now. That with fawns exposed at young ages may possibly mean that it is prevalent in their environment. It's not good no matter how you look at it.
 
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