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Looking for advice on best way to put away my 25 2 stroke mercury. I have always run it dry. However, I recently had a mechanic tell me that my best bet would be to fill it with premium gas treated with Stabil and not run it dry. I would love to hear some opinions
 

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I use my motors often so I didn't ever winterize them. But in your case, non ethanol fuel w stabil, and about 25:1 oil to coat all the internal parts would be just fine. Only other option I would do is remove the cup filter inside the cowling and drain, then drain the carb. I've never been a fan of running the engine completely out of gas. Four stroke motors this would be fine. Two stroke motors w/o oil injection get their lube from the fuel mix and that's it. Leaning that thing out till it dies over time will just add unnecessary wear in my opinion.
 

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Thanks a lot cache
Just my two cents man I've never ran one out like that and I've been running em since I was 6 haha. Funny thing is I've still got the 6 hp Evinrude, 9.8 Mercury, and just sold my old 50 Merc I ran all those years. Everyone of em sit on a rack and can be pulled out, shot of gas, water muffs, and crank right up and that's how I've winterized them all!
 

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I'm gonna take the other side on the running dry issue. 50/1 is more than plenty of oil. They can run 100/1. Even leaner than that at idle. The air fuel mix will go too lean to combust before the lubrication becomes critical at idle speed. Multi-carb'd engines do infact have gravity issues with the bottom carb getting the last of the fuel supply from the vertical feed line. BUT, the fuel bleed lines come into play and provide recirculated fuel to the upper bearings and cylinders. The inline 4cyls of the 100-125hp merc/mariners are a good example. Two of the four cylinders feed off of the recirculation line till about 1800rpm. The bigger mercs with oil/fuel mix systems are a different matter. The mixer will keep pouring oil to the carbs/VST while the fuel runs dry. (counter productive) Over a long period of storage, 2 stroke oil will dry and 'gum'. A few months storage is no real issue in the block, although it can obstruct carb circuits. If it's a long term storage, hit it with fogging oil as the last of the gas burns out. Be sure to upright the motor for complete water drainage.
 

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I was just stating what's worked for me. My old man has worked on just about every kind of motor known to man for the last 55 yrs, and that's what he's always told me. And I've never had a problem. That 9.8 and 6hp are 1970's motors and have never had any problems. The 9.8 Merc still has the original spark plugs in it and will start up in a few seconds so seems like it works pretty good
 

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But the most critical part is ethanol free gas and keeping water out of the entire system and they will run as long as you want to keep em around. Yes more oil than 50:1 will eventually build carbon deposits. But spark plugs are always cheaper than bearings and pistons and a little wide open throttle will bun the carbon out. Motors running for 40+ yrs should attest to that
 

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But the most critical part is ethanol free gas and keeping water out of the entire system and they will run as long as you want to keep em around. Yes more oil than 50:1 will eventually build carbon deposits. But spark plugs are always cheaper than bearings and pistons and a little wide open throttle will bun the carbon out. Motors running for 40+ yrs should attest to that
yep..:up:
 

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I've left the fuel line connected all winter with some engines and others I've run dry. The main thing would be to make sure there isn't water in the motor anywhere to freeze and break something. Pure gas is the way to go always with small engines. I went fishing yesterday for the first time in 6 months. left my fuel hose connected all winter. Motor fired right up and ran great. It's a 1980 model.
 

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You'll need to be careful leaving the fuel line hooked during the summer. The fuel will heat and expand. Can't go back toward the tank. Will over pressurize the system and force the needle valve open in the carb. Either overflow the carb and run out the front or back down in the engine. When night falls, the equalized fuel pressure will begin to drop and pull a fresh dose of fuel up past the primer bulb. Where it will expand the next day. Besides being a fire hazard, can leave your motor extremely flooded.
 
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