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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
new to traditional bowhunting. What is a good all around poundage for a bow. I know ive heard storys of what Fred Bear shot but how about normal men. Im 5'11" 200LB.
 

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I'm about your size and I shoot a 50 pound bow. I've shot bows in the 60's ok, but feel a lot more comfortable with the 50.
A lot more folks mess up get'n too much bow, than not enough, with traditional. A 40# bow will kill a deer.
 

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I'm not an expert but I would suggest something in the 40-45# range to begin with. Kinda learned the hard way, I had been shooting 80# compounds and got a 65# longbow. After about 6 shots I had blood oozing out from under my fingernails. :eek:
 

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Been there myself

I was shooting a compound at 67 lbs when I decided to go traditional. I went with a 50 pound recurve and adjusted to it nicely. I don't think I want to go any heavier.

I also have a 40 pound recurve that is a joy to shoot but somehow I feel more confident that my 50 pound bow is the right one for hunting for me.
 

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Dad's first recurve bow he bought in the early 1970's is around 45# pull, and I'm seriously thinking of putting some arrows together for it....

All this talk about traditional bows, and tales told of Neotoxo holding his own shooting a trad bow agains the modern folks at the "smackdown" has me interested again. It all sort of goes with my "flintlock mentality" approach to hunting and shooting; if you like it, and it's fun, and it's legal, have at it!

Isn't the minimum pull for deer hunting 45 lbs? It's been a loooong time since I looked.
 

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Isn't the minimum pull for deer hunting 45 lbs? It's been a loooong time since I looked.
I think it's 40.

I shoot a 60# compound, and I bought a 50# recurve last winter just to play around with. Maybe I'll hunt with it one day. That's all I would want to bite off.
In fact, I wish I had bought a 40# starter recurve. If I ever got good enough to hunt with one, then I'd buy a nicer one with a little more poundage.
 

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Don't overbow yourself. Get one that is comfortable for you to hold at
your full drawn anchor for about 10 seconds or maybe longer without
getting the shakes.

I can haul back an 80#er but anyone within eyeball range is going to
run for cover cause I'm going to be shaking something crazy.:eek:

I can shoot 60#s to 65#s fairly accurately for about 1/2 dozen shots
then I start getting wore out and if you can't practice with one for 15 to
30 minutes at a time then your not going gain any accuracy.

At 55#s I can shoot quite a while but I do my best with something
around 45#s to 50#s. At that poundage I can hold steady and
concentrate on my spot and just let go when it feels right.:thumb:

Something that says 40#s or better, arrows that weigh in at least
8 or 9 grains per pound of bow and a good scary sharp two blade or
three blade broadhead and you should be good to go for anything
within 25 yards or maybe a little farther if your shooting is up to it.:up:

That combination with a well placed shot will slip completely through
a deer if it doesn't catch a bone.:amen:

Good Luck

From the AGFCs mouth:
08.04 ARCHERY TACKLE RESTRICTION. It shall be unlawful to take
07-00 or attempt to take wildlife with long bow and arrow or compound bow and arrow other than as specified herein.
(A) Bows having a minimum pull of 40 pounds at some point within the draw length.

*Notice it says at some point.* Not at 28". It doesn't state exactly whose
drawlength although it indirectly implies the particular user.

With that said, if you draw a bow to say 29" and the bow is rated for
40#s @ 28" you will probably be pulling around 43#s to 45#s. Likewise
if the bow is rated for 45#s @ 28" and you draw it to 26" you will probably be pulling 37#s to 39#s on average.

To help defer any questions by a Game Warden make sure the bow is
labeled at least 40#s @ 28". I don't think one would ever pull out a
scale and weigh one but it's better to be safe than ticketed.:smack:
 

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I agree with what NEO said but once you start shooting traditional equipment it will be very hard to stop, it is addictive. Look for a bow that doesn't stack up on ya. Usually the higher the bow, the smoother it will be but, you can find some bows that ain't to high that are pretty good. Good luck and have fun!
 

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Start with about 45# and practice, practice, practice. If you can shoot 45# easily and want something stronger, then move up to about 50# and so on until you find the draw weight that is comfortable. You need to start at a lower draw weight to get the muscles toned and used to drawing the bow. As stated, you should be able to comfortably hold at full draw for at least 10 seconds. With a traditional bow, the draw weight increases as it is drawn, there is not let off.
I shoot a 53# @ 28" Checkmate recurve. At my draw it is about 55#. I have no problem going after elk, bear, or deer with this bow and good sharp 2 blade Magnus heads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys for all the advice. I bought a Marting Shadow in 55 lbs. I have no problem pulling the bow to full draw after practice. The bow will were you out after 20 min of shooting. I have got to figure out the instictive shooting idea next.
 
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