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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife found this on our back porch. My neighbor and I opened up its mouth and couldn't find fangs, but I don't know much about snakes. Can you tell me what this kind is...





Thanks for the help.
 

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Northern Water Snake

Range
Statewide, but uncommon in the Delta.

Description
Keeled scales. Light brown or gray with dark brown or reddish-brown bands on fore-body and alternating rows of brown and gray blotches on back and sides of hind-body. Light belly with dark brown, orange, yellow, red and gray half-moons. Young are brightly colored; patterned like adults. Adults 24-42 inches in length.

Habitat and Habits
Most commonly seen water snake in reservoirs and fast-flowing streams and rivers. Active March-October; active at night during summer. Mating occurs in spring and 6-30 young are born July-September. Feeds on fish and frogs. As with the other water snakes, this snake is often misidentified as the venomous cottonmouth or copperhead and is needlessly killed by uninformed individuals.




Alot of folks around here call them water rattlers.

http://www.snakesandfrogs.com/scra/snakes/images/tallman1a.jpg
 

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The eyes of a cottonmouth are not visible when viewed directly from the top. This is one way to distinguish a cottonmouth from a non-venomous water snake.
Florida Cottonmouth
Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for the help. Needless to say my wife didn't care what kind it was she just wanted it out and away from the girls. After I got it in the trash can my oldest wanted to see it and she said "its beautiful." She's almost 3 and kept wanting to look at it. I figured it wasn't a poisonous one so I released it in a field a 1/2 mile up the road. I guess with all the rainfall we had over the last weekend it got lost. I don't live anywhere near water, and I guess it thought that sleeping on my patio was a good idea.
 

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thanks for the help. Needless to say my wife didn't care what kind it was she just wanted it out and away from the girls. After I got it in the trash can my oldest wanted to see it and she said "its beautiful." She's almost 3 and kept wanting to look at it. I figured it wasn't a poisonous one so I released it in a field a 1/2 mile up the road. I guess with all the rainfall we had over the last weekend it got lost. I don't live anywhere near water, and I guess it thought that sleeping on my patio was a good idea.
It's what we call a chicken snake[also rat snake]....it will climb trees to steal eggs[eggs being it's main diet] if you have wrens, sparrows, robins, cardinals, purple martins or any othe small birds nesting then you may have saved them some grief. The best way to catch this egg sucker is to watch the birds...they know him, and will dive bomb him to drive him away!:up:
 

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I was taught that is a Arkansas Prairie King Snake. Note the short dark v on the head, the "no neck look" as head and body blend...Yep...It is a King.

Quote:
This species can be distinguished from the less common Great Plains Rat Snake in several ways. For one, the head of the Prairie Kingsnake is comparatively much smaller; the Great Plains Rat Snake has a distinct neck. Two, the general body shape of Kingsnakes is roundish, whereas Rat Snakes are cross-sectioned like a "loaf of bread". Three, the Great Plains Rat Snake (a close relative of the Corn Snake) has a bold, black-and-white checkered belly. Finally, the darker stripe running through the eye ends at the jaw line in the Prairie Kingsnake, but continues onto the neck in the Great Plains Rat Snake.



http://www.arkansashunting.net/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=453489

http://www.snakesofarkansas.com/gallery/snake/colubridae/
 

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I was taught that is a Arkansas Prairie King Snake. Note the short dark v on the head, the "no neck look" as head and body blend...Yep...It is a King.

Quote:
This species can be distinguished from the less common Great Plains Rat Snake in several ways. For one, the head of the Prairie Kingsnake is comparatively much smaller; the Great Plains Rat Snake has a distinct neck. Two, the general body shape of Kingsnakes is roundish, whereas Rat Snakes are cross-sectioned like a "loaf of bread". Three, the Great Plains Rat Snake (a close relative of the Corn Snake) has a bold, black-and-white checkered belly. Finally, the darker stripe running through the eye ends at the jaw line in the Prairie Kingsnake, but continues onto the neck in the Great Plains Rat Snake.
Good Call CP....it does have the "v" of a caligastor:up:
 
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