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I remember being just home from Viet Nam and the deer season was coming up. I did not have a good rifle so I went to Ft. Smith, AR, one Saturday morning and came home with a Browning Lever Action in .308 and a box of shells. Got it for $125.00. I put a scope on the rifle ( Weaver K-4) shot the box of shells sighting in the scope and getting familiar with the rifle. So a few days later I went back to Ft. Smith and came home with a Lee Loader, primers, powder, and bullets.
Finally the season opened and there I was on the North side of Mt. Magazine at daylight and it was 7 degrees. I thought I was pretty tough but soon found out it was to cold to set on the ground with my back to a big pine tree. So I stood up and starting slipping from one big tree to the next. About 8:45 am I was standing next to a big white oak on the bank of a small creek that had water (ice) in it. I did not like the idea of stepping on the ice to cross the creek so I just stood there mentally planning which way to go without making a lot of noise or getting my scent in the wrong place. I saw a movement in some brush and green briers and there was a really nice 7 Pt buck standing less than 10 yards right in front of me. I looked at his front shoulder through the scope and it was so close the hair on his shoulder looked like strands of well rope. I got the shot off and watched the deer run over a rise in the ground and out of sight. Without moving out of my tracks I could see blood on the ground so I just stood there for a while listening to the sounds of the woods around me. After a while I walked to the top of the little rise and I could see him on the ground about 25 yards from me and it was obvious he was dead. He was a main frame eight but one eye guard was only a bump. The deer weighed 180 lbs field dressed and is the biggest body deer I have ever killed. I don't have a photo of the deer it was lost in one of my many transfer moves with the Forest Service. But I did recover the .308 150gr. Winchester bullet. The bullet was lodged in the off side shoulder just under the hide and I found it while skinning the deer. That was 38 years ago this fall.

Do you have a story to share? :thumb:
 

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Back in the 90's, when we were allowed to take a doe during gun season, I was sitting about 40-feet up a tree when this really nice doe came out of the brush. It was only about a 40-yard shot and it was during muzzle loading season. I let fly and when the smoke cleared there was the doe on the ground right where I shot her. I was sitting up in the tree admiring my work and about two minutes later, out steps a nice 8-point which must have been following the doe. The buck walks up to the doe and sniffs her and I am sitting in the tree with an empty muzzle loader.

Amazing how many moves you have to make to dig around finding the stuff you need to reload a muzzle loader. Getting the powder and slug in and ramming it down the barrel. Digging out the primer. Anyway, I did it all and the buck never left the doe. Guess she must have been in heat or something. Zero'd in on the buck and dropped it right along side the doe.

I always think of that morning as one of my best hunting trips. I had my doubts when I had to drag both deer a couple of hundred yards up a mountain to the truck but looking back on it, it was wonderful


Cheers.....
 

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day 2 of 1991 modern gun season

It was too cold for me to be out that day. No sleep the night before because I had gotten seperated only a week before. About 830 in the AM, I got too cold to be in my stand in Army issue field gear, so i got down and was walking toward the truck for a cup of hot coffee.

I heard my father shoot on 1/4 mile away on the other side of the large field that seperated us. I turned back the way I had come from and walked down the logging road toward the field that my father was hunting in.

The nice 8 point ran out of the field, turned left ran about 20 feet, saw me and stopped no more than 15 feet from me. I raised my rifle and fired. It snapped! No kidding!

I worked the bolt to eject the round and chamber another one. The deer never moved! I raised my rifle, looked through the scope, and pulled the trigger. The second round worked as advertised.

I backed my truck down to the deer and loaded him up.

Kind of funny how you forget about your troubles when Mr. 8 point shows up.

I have told that story time and time again. Nobody believes me, but its the truth. 100%.
 

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November 8, 2003... Opening day of modern gun season. I was hunting our family farm that morning and hadn't seen a whole lot and got down for lunch. I went up to my grandparents house and had lunch with my grandma and started back out to hunt. From the house, you can see a lot of pasture, all the way down to the woods and creekbottoms where most of my stands are. Anyway, I make it back up the road by the haybarn and it looks like there are 3 deer bedded down out in the open. I sneak up to the haybarn and take a rest on a post and look through the scope and see 2 does and a nice buck. They were about 175 yards away and I had an old 30-30 back then that I was using. I whistled and they stood and I fired and flat missed!:smack: Talk about disappointment... I walked up to where they had been standing and sure enough, no blood or anything. I look up across the field and they are standing in the edge of the treeline by the slough, about 200 yards out. That is a pretty far shot offhand with a 30-30 and needless to say miss #2. I am really kicking myself for missing the first shot and not taking enough time on the second. I don't think I've ever sunk that low deer hunting before then or since. The only time I've been more sick and disappointed was the first doe I ever shot bowhunting that we lost and didn't find for a few days until she had spoiled. Luckily, that is the only deer I've ever lost in that manner. Anyway, back to the story. I remember calling my dad and telling him how sick I was about missing a good buck not once, but twice. I decided to go on across the creek to a ladder stand I had on the food plot we had planted. I got over there and set up and was still pretty down. Well, about an hour later, I see movement at the end of the foodplot in waist-chest high grass. I can make out a doe and then I see the same buck standing there. I watched him for at least 5 minutes through the scope and he never moved. All I could see was his neck up, mostly his rack and I knew to try not to concentrate on that!:biggrin: It was on my far right and luckily, I taught myself to shoot with both hands. I had a small window to shoot through some tree limbs at my stand height in that direction. Finally, he stepped forward enough I could see shoulder and neck and head. I lined up and hoped the third time was a charm. At the shot, I saw him run forward. I waited 15 minutes or so and got down and started that direction. As I got closer I saw 2 deer run out of the creekbottom, cross the creek, and run into the field beyond. My uncle and cousins were hunting the other field and had heard the shot and saw the deer run out too. I was beginning to think I had missed a third time, but eventually, I got to searching in the tall grass and he was lying there not 10 yards from where I shot him. To date, he is the biggest bodied deer I've ever killed. He weighed 205 live weight and was a basic 8 pointer with a kicker off the back of the right brow tine, making him a 9 pointer. I'll never know how I missed two shots out in the broad open pasture and snuck a 135 yard shot offhand though some thick stuff dead-on! When I went back with the 4-wheeler to load him, I got up there and there stood a buck that had to be his twin right over the top of him. I didn't have time to think about grabbing my gun before he ran out of the foodplot and crossed the creek. My uncle, coming to help my dad and I load it, missed a shot at that buck or we could have doubled. It took me, my dad, and my uncle to get him loaded in the truck.:up: I quit using that 30-30 after that season when I got a new Remington 7-mag at Christmas that year and haven't missed a deer since. Luckily, the 3rd time was a charm that year though. Here was the buck in the story. I mounted him with a doe in tall grass to remind me of that day...
 

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Boy, it's hard to pick my favorite. But to date, this is the story of my best bow-kill buck. In fact, it is my best buck period.

I was hunting a friend's farm and I’m not sure, but I think this deer is the same deer that the owner's friend had seen late the previous season but didn’t get a shot at him. My first knowledge of him came when the owner's wife informed me that they had seen a “whopper” buck at their farm. Not knowing if she really new a good deer when they saw one, I took this with a grain of salt.

A few weeks later (October 31st) I was hunting the farm up and at about 3:30 pm I caught a glimpse of a deer moving along an old road that was out of bow range. I was able to get my binoculars on him just before he turned and crossed the end of a cove headed south. I could tell that he was a real nice buck. I thought, "Maybe the she does know a good buck when she sees one."

My next hunt (November 3rd) found me back on the farm. I set up my stand in a small white oak right near the end of the cove where I had seen the buck cross the week before. While I was in the stand, I noticed a faint trail leading across the end of the cove and about 2 yards from my stand. A little too close to the trail I thought. At about 4:00 pm, I heard footsteps behind me from the direction of the farm house. I was watching to the northwest because that is the direction I had seen the buck come from before. I turned expecting to see a deer, but found their dog coming down the deer trail. She stopped at the junction of the deer trail and the trail paralleling the cove then turned and went back from where she came from. About 15 minutes later I again heard footsteps behind me. I turned fully expecting to see the dog again. To my surprise, I a really nice buck quickly approaching. I stood to ready myself for the shot that I was sure would come. Unfortunately, he sensed something. I don’t know if he caught a little motion (but he never did look at me), or heard me stand or perhaps he smelled me as my scent was blowing directly across the trail at exactly the spot where he stopped. Incidentally, I had forgotten my hunting boots and had to hunt in my street loafers that day. I’m sure there was a scent trail there to discover. Anyway, the buck stopped at about 3 yards from my stand! Since he was quartering toward me and was behind a cedar tree, I was not offered a shot. He stood there for maybe 10 to 15 seconds then suddenly wheeled and bounded back in the same direction he came from. Needless to say, I was very disappointed. I just experienced a close encounter with the biggest whitetail buck that I’ve ever seen on the hoof and, at the time, was sure that I wouldn’t see him again after that.

The next time out, I set up in a tree 20 yards off the trail to the east. While I didn’t expect to see the buck again, it looked like a good spot to encounter a deer. Much to my surprise, at about 3:15 pm, I saw the buck coming down the trail paralleling the cove just exactly like he did the first time I saw him. He was about 60 yards away at this time. I readied myself for the shot, but wasn’t real excited yet as I wasn’t sure he was going to cut the cove in the same spot or not. My heart sank when he turned toward the water about 50 yards away. Just as he got to the water’s edge he seemed to change his mind and turned toward me. He followed the edge of the water and then proceeded to cross the end of the cove at the trail. I bleated and stopped him just before he got to the water. In seconds, my arrow was on its way. Much to my surprise, he stiffened and fell over. Somehow, I had managed to hit him in the spine. I could be that I just hit high or he had jumped the string. Not the best shot in the world, but he was mine, my best buck yet!

He has 9 points, a basic 8 pointer with a 4 inch non-typical point on his right antler. His gross score is about 120, but with deductions nets about 110. He weighed 160 pounds on the hoof. I aged him at 3 years old.

 

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Mine would have to be the buck I killed from the ground with no blind.

My best friend and I had been camped at his place for a couple of days and even though we had several stands on this place we had neglected to really get anything up (as in 20ft loc on type stands) that would hunt on an east wind.

We knew from the weather report the night before that an east is what we'd be dealing with the next day.

The next morning was a bowhunters dream......clear as a bell, high pressure system in place and cold.....about 25 degrees in late November. So there was no way I was going to miss a morning like that so I decided to hunt out of a cheap 15 foot ladder stand that was perfect for the wind. Cheap is a little misleading.....cheap as poorly built. Thin wall pipe, tiny seat.....very uncomfortable "BUT" it was going to have to do for that morning. I wasn't watching this day from the sidelines....no way.

I get to the stand and find that the brace that kicks back from the center of the ladder to the tree was missing. I think to myself...."well this is great" but start up the ladder anyway. About half way up the ladder bends and bows in towards the tree because of the missing brace. Well damn.....I think to myself. Here it is.....30 minutes before light and here I am in a jam. No way I'm going back up that ladder......it would just bend again so I thought i'll just find me a tree and pull up a seat. I figured if I can kill a turkey off the ground......surely I can at least wack a doe.

I found a big oak tree that would hide my silohuette and put my face mask on, gloves etc and burried up.

About 5 minutes after good shooting light I heard the tell tale sound of foot steps in the dry leaves....several foot steps in fact. I look to my left and se a big cow headed heiffer and 2 yearlings about 25 yds away. I let them get past and start to draw my bow on the big doe and she bust's my butt bigger than Dallas. She runs out to about 60 yds and starts blowing and stomping and raising all kinds of commotion. I was pretty discouraged at this point. She stood out there a lillte while and bounced off.

i figured my hunt was pretty much over so I pulled off the face mask, threw it over to the side and put me a big ol' dip of Skoal in. Hey......I figured if nothing else I was going to enjoy a beautiful morning.

A few minutes later I hear a rustling in the leaves behind me and a grunt.........Holy Crap...I look over to my left again and see a nice 8 point chasing a doe around behind my tree at 30 yds. I'm watching them from behind the tree sitting flat on my butt. He rousts her up again and they are heading in my direction so I get my bow ready and draw. he chased her to within 20 yds and I mean you could not have scripted it any better......he stopped at 20 yds and I drilled him. He ran off and I was sure I heard him crash but not knowing 100% i backed out and came back that afternoon and found him piled up about 100 yds away.

My best bow kill to date.
http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/25702deer.JPG
 

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The one where I made the 350yd shot off-handed, and everybody in the camp came back the following year with these monster rifles capable of very long ranges....but nobody was up to the task and much ammo was being wasted. At some point after that, I quit...so maybe the pressure was off and folks went back to normal!
 

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One of my biggest bodied deer was killed at 8 steps with a muzzleloader. I had walked up the the thicket where several bucks hung out and spooked a descent 8 point without getting a shot. So knowing there was a bachelor group hanging out there I sat down against a small Oak. Had'nt been there 5 minutes when I thought I heard or sensed something behind the tree. As I turned around and saw it was a big 9 point at about 8 steps looking at me! All I could see in the scope was his chest , being in an awkward postion. I fired and lost sight in the smoke. Looked for about 1 hour and found no sight of a hit.:frown: Well down in the dumps I walked down the dry slough kickin my arse for missing. There was my buck dead as a door nail , not a drop of blood?:head: There was a round hole where the .44 pistol sabot cut a hole center of his chest. The buck was a nice 9 point that field dressed over 170 lbs!:up:
 

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A couple of years ago I wanted to take my oldest niece out dear hunting. I picked her up off of the school bus and we headed to the woods on my dad's farm behind his sawmill shed. It was mostly just time to spend with her and giving her an adult to listen to and talk with, her dad, my brother ain't much of a parent, and neither is her mother.

Anyhow I never really expect to see much cause like I said we're twenty yards away from my folks back door and we're talking. Well while Alex is telling me about a movie she resently saw I keep thinking I'm hearing a dear walking in the leaves. I'm trying to pay attention to her, but I keep hearing this dear. Finally I get to looking around and I see this young doe about 60 yards away slipping through the trees. I get all excited like I havn't ever seen a dear in my life. I'm so stoked that Alex is going to be able to watch me shoot a doe!

Now I'm a former Marine Scout Sniper, and not to brag, but a dear standing 60 yards away isn't exactly a challenging shot, but darned if I didn't blow it! First time since I started hunting I missed a dear! Man a feller gets so used to seeing bang flop I started to feel like the Mighty Casey at bat! It took off like a scalded dog, and I start to cuss myself flat disgusted for missing a slam dunk shot. I look over at Alex and there she is all wide eyed and shaking like a leaf. She tells me " Its OK uncle Chris I think I'da missed her too!" Well I never laughed so hard in all my life. I wouldn't trade that moment for all the beer in Brumbly.
 
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