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I am re-leasing the land I hunt next year, and this time I would like to do a food plot. I've seen the throw and grow stuff, how does it work? Is it really "just" throw and grow? Soil up there is rocky, and on a mountain. I have plenty of time to start working on it, but would like to start researching options.
 

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One guy at our camp put some out, but on ground that had been broken up before.........just not that year. It did great.

I put some out at the farm, with some I had to use or lose (Date), on a spot with fairly hard ground, and lots of leaves.........and about 9 stalks of clover came up about a tenth of an inch!
 

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Throw and grow is mostly rye grass, which grows well pretty much anywhere, but doesn't provide a lot of nutrition or attractiveness to deer. For the same amount of work, I'd just plant white clover. You plant it at 4-6 pounds per acre and the seed is small, so it grows almost anywhere too. Plus clover tolerates grazing pressure well and will grow several years in a row if taken care of.
 

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1/8th-1/4 of an acre that gets a lot of sun. Traffic is by ATV.
First thing, in a wooded area is to pull a soil sample and take to your county extension agency. They will tell you what needs to be applied. I would suspect lime for sure and maybe P&K. All these can be bought at low cost in bag form and applied by hand. If lime is needed get pelletized lime. Is fast acting, a little higher but works fast. More than likely a fertilizer will also be needed. You can go the commercial route, P&K can be got with these, or a more organic type like manure which helps build and loosen the soil. Manure will be more work but long term benefits are worth it. Remove all grass and leaves before you start.

Now when you do this just take a drag and work it in. One best ways that I have used in spots like yours is to build one. And 8 foot 2x10 and some spike nails driven thru it every 4 inches to where they stick out about 4 inches works wonders. Tie on a couple concrete blocks on top, hook a rope to each end, hook to atv and drag away until you get it worked up. Then just pull to side and leave till time to plant.

No matter what you plant, prep is 95% of it working or not. After that it all depends upon the rain gods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Should I mow the existing grass/weeds down? Or maybe weed killer it all? And then drag? When I do the sample...do I need to go get a container from them, or just bring in my own stuff? Do I just dig up some dirt and thats that? Thanks for any help.
 

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Midwest whitetail on the web has a good video on a " poor man plot" it is very informative
Also growing deer tv on the web has some good stuff
If you are in the hills I would reco mind gdtv grant woods has good info and his farm is just out of Branson mo
 

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Should I mow the existing grass/weeds down? Or maybe weed killer it all? And then drag? When I do the sample...do I need to go get a container from them, or just bring in my own stuff? Do I just dig up some dirt and thats that? Thanks for any help.
If there is grass/weeds there now and if safe to do just burn it off. If you are going to be a while till you work on it & green starts growing hit it with round up. You can sample any time but the sooner the better to get results back. Either/Or on the sample. Dig up and place in container then can place it in their sample when you go there or go get it first.
 

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I am re-leasing the land I hunt next year, and this time I would like to do a food plot. I've seen the throw and grow stuff, how does it work? Is it really "just" throw and grow? Soil up there is rocky, and on a mountain. I have plenty of time to start working on it, but would like to start researching options.
Yes, if the ground is WET and you get a slow RAIN on the seeds wheat and rye will grow. Personally I never plant rye, the deer won't touch it in my area until very late winter ( February ) when there is nothing else to eat.
I don't even worry about having bare ground. I throw it out by hand on shooting lanes. This will greatly up the odds that a deer will stop for a nibble.
I have planted this lane for the past 3 years since they thinned the pines.
The key is to get a rain on it fast before the birds and animals eat it before it sprouts.

This is part of a lane I planted in wheat this year. I hand planted 3 - 50lb bags. It took me about 20 min to plant. ( the bare spots are where the deer had eaten rice bran. )
The week before I took about 30 minutes to chop down some taller weeds and briars that grew from last year.
Ill admit if it were plowed or dragged it may look better but it has too many stumps. It extends another 100 yards behind where I stood to take the pic.
This shows you don't have to have big equipment and spend a lot of money to have a killing plot.

This buck was shot here in 2013




 

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I'd go with wheat. Will grow pretty much anywhere with a little moisture and deer eat it well. We had some left over seed after our normal plots this year so we just scattered it out around one of our stands in the woods. Had pretty thick layer of leaves everywhere but got some pretty good rains so it settled in good and came up everywhere very thick. Seed heavy.
 

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When is the best time of year to do the clover/wheat rout?
I've heard of people doing clover and wheat more in the fall. The wheat gives the deer something to eat while the clover gets established underneath and then the clover comes on strong in the spring when the wheat dies off or is eaten down. I have heard of people doing a clover and oats combo in the spring for the same reasons. I may try that in early March in some areas that I want to get clover established for the fall.
 

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Thank you, would you suggest go ahead and doing clover this spring to get something established, then coming back and doing wheat in the fall with clover again
If you have the time and resources, I'd go ahead and start now and plant clover when you can. I planted some in February last year and we got a good snow and ice the next week. After it melted, the clover was already coming up. If it grows good enough, you can just leave it and hunt over it in the fall. If the clover doesn't do well in the spring, you can plant wheat or clover/wheat before deer season. Grass Tree Soil Plant Lawn
This was a small clearing in the woods that was steep and rocky. The clover grew great, but the drought killed most of it off before fall.
 

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Excellent, one last question, is there a certain brand you use or just go down to the farmers market and find some
I live in Vilonia, so I get ladino clover seed from the farmers co-op in Conway for $4/pound. 4 pounds will cover an acre, so it goes a long way. The seed is very small, so you don't have to plant it deep. In my opinion, you can do the same work for a throw and grow plot, but plant clover and end up with a more beneficial plot that will last for years if taken care of.
 
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