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My dad planted some Buck Wheat last year for the flowers it produces for his Bee Hives, and the deer destroyed it, I mean they ate it up. If you've never seen it, it will surprise you. It's not you're typical green single blade grass like normal wheat. it actually produces a hollow stem that sprouts leaves and flower pods. I believe he told me he paid around $40.00 bucks for a fifty pound sack of seed. I will be planting some of it as soon as the threat of frost passes. It will not tolerate cold very well. Sun-flowers is another summertime crop I hear people plant. purple hull, or black-eye peas, Rape or canola as some people call it is another drought tolerant plant that resembles a turnip plant. Rape seed is fairly cheap. I bought mine last year in Little Rock at River City Seed company, a fifty pound sack for around $25.00 the seeds are very small, a little larger than turnip seed. Do a Google serach for Summer Time foodplots and I'm sure you will find many different ideas.:wink:
 

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Premium Member<br>Merganser Slayer<br>2011 Turkey
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I've been planting food plots on my property for a few years now. I've found the best "all purpose" food plot is a clover/chicory mix. I've had really good luck with the Imperial Whitetail "Chicory Plus". Both deer and turkeys LOVE it. Unfortunately, it's really too late to plant a perennial, unless it's in a low area that holds moisture. It won't have enough time to put down a root system before summer. I've got a friend that's had good luck the last few years planting soybeans. They're pretty cheap, too. Try the clover and chicory mix this fall.
 

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BDW, your right about the clover but I can't say the same for the chicory. I've only planted it once and that was this past year but I've had problem with cows getting in the food-plot and never got to see much production out of it. What I've got is a small area on the low-side of the plot that I plant the peas, turnips and stuff like that in. I think this gives them a little something extra during the mid to late summer months and gives the clover a chance to recover a little from the winter. I may not know what I'm talking about but that's my theory.
 

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I'm with BDW. I've tried several types of plantings in south Arkansas, but the Whitetail Institute "chicory plus" (the plus is imperial clover) is by far the best I have every used. I have about 4 acres of it. The deer love it, as do the turkeys. Plant it in the fall, but make sure you get your ph right. I had to learn the hard way, tried to bypass that step...wrong move. :smack: :eek: Do a soil test, and...did I say "Do a soil test?" :thumb:
 

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I think I've found a place to get soybeans for $20 a bushel. Peas are a little high.
Pay the extra money for the Peas. Unless you have a large area to plant....over 10acres....soybeans will let you down if you have any deer pressure at all. Soybeans will stop growing and die as soon as the terminal bud is eaten out of it, and deer usually do this to the plant before it ever gets over 5" tall. A Pea just sprouts more and more stems and leaves the more it's grazed.
 

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Premium Member<br>Merganser Slayer<br>2011 Turkey
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Rico's right about getting your ph right, especially with clover. I've also bought a bag of the Imperial Power Plant that I'm gonna try this spring, too. I've heard really good things about it. I'll know in a couple of months. The mistake a lot of folks make is that they don't give food plots any thought until Sept. or Oct., and they go throw a little rye grass seed out for a hunting plot. I've found that if you'll feed 'em during the spring and summer, they WILL be around come hunting season.
 
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