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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So…how many of you folks use a scope level when mounting glass versus just eyeballing it? Is so, what do you use to level the action?

Thanks!!!
 

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You may already know this. Just hang a string from the top of a door, ceiling light, etc...across the room as far as you can, & make sure there's no draft. With the rifle on a table in a solid position....line up the vertical crosshair in the scope, with that string hanging down, & you should be very close.
 

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I've got a small rope my trapping gambrel is on I can see out of the shop. I line mine up on it...d2
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You may already know this. Just hang a string from the top of a door, ceiling light, etc...across the room as far as you can, & make sure there's no draft. With the rifle on a table in a solid position....line up the vertical crosshair in the scope, with that string hanging down, & you should be very close.
Am I correct in assuming that technique is only as good as how perfectly vertical the rifle action is positioned while you align the crosshairs?

The reason I asked is there is a Tipton system on sale that has a gun vice frame with adjustable feet on all 4 corners & multiple level indicators to make sure your rifle is perfectly level before you rotate the scope to true vertical.

The plumb bob string set at distance has to be better than the bubble level on the scope that comes with the Tipton set up. Not sure how much having the rifle action locked into true vertical buys you?

Maybe overkill?
 

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Am I correct in assuming that technique is only as good as how perfectly vertical the rifle action is positioned while you align the crosshairs?

The reason I asked is there is a Tipton system on sale that has a gun vice frame with adjustable feet on all 4 corners & multiple level indicators to make sure your rifle is perfectly level before you rotate the scope to true vertical.

The plumb bob string set at distance has to be better than the bubble level on the scope that comes with the Tipton set up. Not sure how much having the rifle action locked into true vertical buys you?

Maybe overkill?
Well, certainly you want the rifle to be as straight vertical as possible. If it is not, it should be noticeable when you try to line up the string with the vertical crosshair in your scope. When mounting a scope, I mount my rifle in my rifle rests I use at the gun range. I have never used that Tipton system for leveling a rifle, but it sounds reasonable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, certainly you want the rifle to be as straight vertical as possible. If it is not, it should be noticeable when you try to line up the string with the vertical crosshair in your scope. When mounting a scope, I mount my rifle in my rifle rests I use at the gun range. I have never used that Tipton system for leveling a rifle, but it sounds reasonable.
I just bought it. I’ll let you know how it works.
 

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The last time I did it, I used those Wheeler levels. Every time I would start to tighten the ring screws the scope would roll slightly out of position. I tried to apply pressure equally in both directions, but it just kept happening. The top of my rifle's action is flat, so I got a wedge kit. If you have a flat spot on top of your action and the bottom of the scope, wedges make life a lot easier.
 

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Generally I put the rifle in a padded gun vice and level the mounting area (picatiny or receiver mounts) in both directions... Then I attach the rings and scope, adjust for eye relief, lightly tighten but can still rotate scope and then put the bubble level on the top turret flat... once I have it level I shoulder the rifle (still in the gunvise) to check that it is vertical with my shouldering and that the eyebox is ok... adj as necessary and torque the screws with a Wheeler driver... using blue loctite of course... then bore sight at 25-50yd.
I find the circular levels to be too hard to center, so just use a linear bubble, turning it as needed. I don't know how those strings and door frames are of any help as they can be out of square to your receiver. You're trying to lever the scope to the receiver and to the way you mount it to your shoulder... IMO

ETA: Im not trying to suggest canting the scope, the verticle crosshair should align with the receiver-stock centerline... If when shouldering it, you see a definite cant, then that tells you that your bringing it up skewed and to look at your technique... not to rotate the scope... just wanted to clarify that without quoting myself... ;)
 

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pull the bolt and bisect the bore with the plumb line while aligning the crosshair with the line.
i just keep a line on the target.
 

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This leveler works and it’s quick to set up. It levels the action and then just twist the scope to match the horizontal lines.

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well, certainly you want the rifle to be as straight vertical as possible. If it is not, it should be noticeable when you try to line up the string with the vertical crosshair in your scope. When mounting a scope, I mount my rifle in my rifle rests I use at the gun range. I have never used that Tipton system for leveling a rifle, but it sounds reasonable.
Here’s what you get: The frame is substantial & heavy enough to be solid & durable. It’s adjustable at multiple points on X & Y axis for proper leveling. The stock pillars holding the stock clamps can be elevated or retracted for multiple tasks. The vise clamp pads are articulated. It includes a vise block attachment to facilitate AR breakdown & support. It comes with 2 Wheeler bubble levels for scope mounting. Best of all it will easily hang on a deck screw on the wall beside the gun room desk out of the way. I didn’t have a decent gun vise so this is a win/win for me 👍
Well, certainly you want the rifle to be as straight vertical as possible. If it is not, it should be noticeable when you try to line up the string with the vertical crosshair in your scope. When mounting a scope, I mount my rifle in my rifle rests I use at the gun range. I have never used that Tipton system for leveling a rifle, but it sounds reasonable.
Here’s the deal: It’s heavy enough to be stable & durable & adjusts on all 4 corners for leveling. The vise pillars raise, lower, & lock for different tasks and the vise clamps are articulated. It has a vise block attachment to facilitate AR work. It comes with 2 different Wheeler bubble levels & best of all (to me)
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it will hang on a heavy deck screw on the wall beside my gun room desk, out of the way until I need it. I didn’t have a proper gun vise so this is a win for me, above & beyond scope mounting. 👍
 

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Pretty cool unit, lots of versatility... don't look cheap either...
Looks like you should have an engineering degree to properly use it...;)
 
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