Arkansas Hunting banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been reloading for a while. And everybody has there own way of doing things. Just curious on what order you go. When I’m reloading a new load for a specific gun I always start with minimal suggested powder and load 3, and then go up 1gn to max load. Obviously loading 3 of each. And seat bullet to my books testing length. After shooting those loads I find best group and then work up .5 and down .5 to see if there’s a drastic change. After finding my powder I get measurement to the lands In that rifle and compare to the tested load. I then load 3 more sets of 3, with first measurement and one right off the lands without jamming, next one is in between both measurements. Shoot those and see which is best group and go with it. Anyone had better ways or different technique?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
I start by finding the lands and load to that length, assuming it will fit the magazine. I generally start with a mid range load and work up in half or .2 grain increments, especially as I approach max loads. I do try to find several sources or data before starting, some books max load is less than another’s starting load. In that case, I start with the more aggressive books low range load. For pistol rounds, it really just depends on my application, but, generally I just pick a mid range load and if it cycles the action, I run it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I start by finding the lands and load to that length, assuming it will fit the magazine. I generally start with a mid range load and work up in half or .2 grain increments, especially as I approach max loads. I do try to find several sources or data before starting, some books max load is less than another’s starting load. In that case, I start with the more aggressive books low range load. For pistol rounds, it really just depends on my application, but, generally I just pick a mid range load and if it cycles the action, I run it.
Do you always seat against the lands and have good groups or do you ever play with the length? I know from what I’ve read the Barnes ttsx like the jump and from what I’ve tested it seems to be true. I know rule of thumb is closer to lands better accuracy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
I usually research what powder/weight/bullet, etc others have found to be accurate & if I find repetition In recommendations, I will start there, backing off at least a full grain or even 2 if it’s a max load. Some manuals list accuracy loads. Each gun is a rule unto itself but I’ve found the success of others a good place to start. I also use a chronograph to look for tight clustering in sd. Accuracy & consistent velocity don’t always correlate, but they often do. OAL can make a big difference or not. To start I seat to touch lands, then back off 5/1000”.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
I pretty much do what geslayton and willyb71 do...
First measure where the bullet olgive contacts the lands and back off a little for my OAL (use the proper seater for this to work), consult several manuals and judge if their typically hot or not, look for what others have found accurate, start about 5% under the estimated max (based on the multi-books & users reports... cuz my guns are special) load 5 rounds in .5-.2-.1-.05gr increments (as I approach, exceed max), chrono every round and look for pressure... looking for 4 shot groups (always throw out 1). Most of the time use same headstamp and prep specs (no-size decapper and bushing neck size die is a must), Sometimes compare primers (found Wolf copper to be more precise [smaller groups] than most US brands), OAL, concentric run-out, etc.
Lots of things to try- makes for a lot of interesting shooting but you have to log all that data too...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
With the price of bullets these days, I try to get the most accuracy with my first five shot group. If I do my part, I seldom look further….but I don’t shoot competition. I have found finicky rifles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
A few years ago, anticipating a component shortage, I did a lot of testing with various powders and primers... even case weights and volume capacity ... and compared them in several rifles... mostly 223 and 308, to get a list of preferred loads in case all I could find was xxx or yyy. During the shortages the store shelves are often bare except for that one powder nobody uses... except me.
I also used to find older powder and primers at gun shows but not anymore. Nevertheless, I have loads already worked up for a lot of different things.

One other thing I looked at (Group precision was #1) was velocity. If I was developing a 223 practice round, then I wanted it to duplicate M193 or M855 performance (velocity & trajectory), so that any surplus that I might use would perform similarly. If I was developing JSP/JHP bullets then they needed to meet a certain velocity range at the intended target distance in order to expand as designed.

I chrono every shot... many times I found, in multiple rifles, published loads fail to come close (by 200fps or more) to what they are supposed to or even to meet factory loads. In one test of my M193 clone ([email protected]' out of a 20" milsurp bbl) ... I set up a 2nd chrono at 100yd in front of my target. I was a little surprised that it clocked 294 fps slower than the one 15' from the muzzle.

Now I know a dead deer can't tell the difference between a bullet going 2500fps and one going 3000fps, but at 200-300 yds the difference in drop might... or the one that got away to die in the bush because the bullet didn't expand because it was going too slow...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A few years ago, anticipating a component shortage, I did a lot of testing with various powders and primers... even case weights and volume capacity ... and compared them in several rifles... mostly 223 and 308, to get a list of preferred loads in case all I could find was xxx or yyy. During the shortages the store shelves are often bare except for that one powder nobody uses... except me.
I also used to find older powder and primers at gun shows but not anymore. Nevertheless, I have loads already worked up for a lot of different things.

One other thing I looked at (Group precision was #1) was velocity. If I was developing a 223 practice round, then I wanted it to duplicate M193 or M855 performance (velocity & trajectory), so that any surplus that I might use would perform similarly. If I was developing JSP/JHP bullets then they needed to meet a certain velocity range at the intended target distance in order to expand as designed.

I chrono every shot... many times I found, in multiple rifles, published loads fail to come close (by 200fps or more) to what they are supposed to or even to meet factory loads. In one test of my M193 clone ([email protected]' out of a 20" milsurp bbl) ... I set up a 2nd chrono at 100yd in front of my target. I was a little surprised that it clocked 294 fps slower than the one 15' from the muzzle.

Now I know a dead deer can't tell the difference between a bullet going 2500fps and one going 3000fps, but at 200-300 yds the difference in drop might... or the one that got away to die in the bush because the bullet didn't expand because it was going too slow...
I agree with you on velocity matters.. because there’s a big difference in “I hit a deer at 300yds” and “i killed a deer at 300yds” this was my 7mag 140gn nosler at 200yds. Went through both front shoulders and was stuck in the hide on exit. Deer dropped where she stood and never flinched again. Pleased with the expansion and performance but would have expected to not be able to find the bullet at 200yds

Brown Plumbing fixture Sink Tap Bathroom sink
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
30 cal SST, I agree on separation.
What I do is load them in .308 at min velocity and they do well. Great accuracy, too much fragmentation with .06 and higher cals. Would not use in magnums. Just my .02 cents
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top