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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am fairly new to deer hunting, this will be my third year to gun hunt but i have never bowhunted and i want to try it out this year (something i said i wouldn't do).

I have the basic necessities to get started, I would like someone's opinion on using a "loop". Is it just a preference?

Also, before i go to the local sporting goods store to get some "advice", when they realize i know nothing about bow hunting they will try to sell me everything I don't need and I won't know the difference.:head:

Could I get someone's opinion on things that i need for the hunt that i may overlook and maybe things to look out for that the salesman may try to get me to buy that i really don't need.

thermacell, loop, etc...

any help is appreciated.

Thanks
 

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I use a loop but it is not the string type. I use a metel one called a ultra nok, i like it better because it doesn't wear out like the string ones. Loops help save wear on your string and help to keep your arrow from poping off the string if you draw back to fast and over draw you bow. As far as things you need the most importent are Your bow a good release, sights, arrow rest, arrows and broadheads. Everything else is just a personal choice that is up to you and that depends on how much stuff you want to carry with you.
 

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start with the basics: bow, rest, arrows w/target points and a bag target. Go out in the field and shoot that bow for a few weeks before you make any decisions on the fancy extras. Also, do what you are doing and ask someone who's not trying to make a buck off of you for an opinion. I think you're off to a good start!:up:
 

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Premium Member<br>2009 Turkey Contest Winner<br>20
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I've personally never shot a loop, being I've always felt like is was just one more thing that could go wrong (slip or break), but I will say this they will keep your string in a lot better condition.

Yeah stick with the basics starting off, I do highly suggest a release and a peep sight. The biggest thing is practice, practice, practice when ya first start out. Also when hanging your stand place it in position for an easy kill. I like them within 20 yards and have killed my fair share within this range.
 

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i have been bowhunting for quite a while. i feel like i have fine tuned my setup, to be about the most efficient hunting rig, not 3d, that i could possibly have. i will share my setup with you. some may not think its the best, but it sure works for me.

a good modern bow, shooting close to 300 fps, with carbon arrows, and 100 grain heads, should be able to shoot flat enough to only need one pin, out to 30 or 35 yards.

Browning F5 Tornado, with a draw weight of 72lbs

arrows, Gold Tip XT Hunters, around 27.5 inches long.

Whisker Biscuit arrow rest. this is, in my opinion the best "hunting" rest ever built. when in a treestand, you dont have to worry at all about your arrow falling off the rest. you can lay it across your lap or whatever.

2'' Blazer Vanes, with Blazer wraps. these short vanes have very good flight, and are not affected at all by the bristles on the whisker biscuit, like 4'' vanes are. the reason for the wraps are, the vanes seem to adhere better than to the bare shaft, and they look cool too!

100 grain NAP Spitfire Mechanical broadheads. i swear by these things. they fly just like field points, and leave an excellent wound channel. i have had complete pass throughs on every deer i have shot, except for two spine shots. i bought three of these heads in 1999, and am still shooting two of them. the third i lost when i missed a deer, (shooter error) and could not find the arrow. they have practice blades available for them, and a set of refill blades is only about 15 bucks. they have no o rings or washers to keep the blades closed, it uses a thin piece of steel with a "detent" on it to keep them closed.

i have the Sims Limb Savers, and string leeches. they are worth every penny at reducing bow noise.

i like the string loop over the metal d loops. the string can still be torqued with the d loop, but is almost impossible with a string loop. also, the d loops are heavier, and on drastically reflexed bows, the can actually make the string fly forward enough to strike the shooters wrist. (seen it, pse baby g)

a caliper release with a wrist strap is what i use. strap it on and it is always right there. i use a cobra, but there are many to choose from. get one with an adjustable trigger, and you can get as sweet a pull as your favorite rifle.

peep sights, keep it simple. something that is easy to see through, lets in enough light, and turns the same every time. i use the ones that have three slots for the string.

sights, as much as you want to spend. i am still using a cheapo cobra fiber optic 3 pin sight, but my buddy MO HUNTER just bought a trophy ridge vertical in line sight, and i now have sight pin envy. we shot last night right before dark, and his pins looked like l.e.d. lights compared to mine.

get a good dampening type stabilizer, but not one that is real long. Sims makes a good one, i use an NAP Shokblocker.

with this setup, my pins are, top pin, 0 to 35 yds, second pin 45 yards, third pin 55 yards. 65 yards is third pin on top of the deers back. now before the ethics police nab me, i practice all summer at 45 to 65 yards, so 30 yarders are like throwing rocks in the ocean, you cant miss. shooting at long distances during practice sessions ensure that you will fine tune your form to shoot consistent groups at that distance.

hope this helps you, and good luck, BG12
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
practice?

Thanks for all the help, I bought some practice tips for the arrows, do i need to be using them or broadheads when i practice?

Do I need to practice with what i will be using in the woods? Am i ok with using the practice tips?
 

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Thanks for all the help, I bought some practice tips for the arrows, do i need to be using them or broadheads when i practice?

Do I need to practice with what i will be using in the woods? Am i ok with using the practice tips?
Use the feild tips first to get used to shooting your bow,Practice is really what your first objective is.build up the different muscles used in shooting a bow.once you get where you can hit where you want to,then try shooting some broadheads.Don't get discouraged if your not any good at first, It will come.You think Buck fever is bad with a gun in your hand, wait till you draw your bow on a buck.

Broadheads are more expensive to lose than field tips are.
 

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Thanks for all the help, I bought some practice tips for the arrows, do i need to be using them or broadheads when i practice?

Do I need to practice with what i will be using in the woods? Am i ok with using the practice tips?
For now, I'd keep practicing with the field points, I've never noticed much difference anyway between points and broadheads as to how they fly. Of course, at some point I would shoot some broadheads. Another good idea is to practice a lot of 1 shot shooting, deer usually just give you one shot, gotta make it count, try varying distances too. If you can, shoot some from the stands you plan to use. I used to have a house with a real high back deck, loved to shoot from there. I will say that height, kinda like broadheads, never seemed to effect how I shot, but I also never get real high with my stands either. Above all, have fun, bowhunting the whitetail deer is a rush that's hard to top.
 

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You may or may not know this but when trying to adjust your sights move the sight/pin the same direction your arrow is off. Shoot groups of 3 or 5 at your target. If your groups are missing to the left move your sights to the left, shooting to high move the pins up. Little mirco adjustments until you start hitting where you want. When you feel tired stop shooting.
Once everything starts falling into place you'll have a blast. Bowhunting is addictive. This is my second year bowhunting and I love every minute of it.
 

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You are getting some good advice. The loop thing is pretty much a matter of choice. I've shot a string loop for 8 years now and have not had a problem with it wearing out or coming loose. Some say a loop is better than direct attachment to the string as this puts the arrow nock directly in line with the apex of the "V" shape the string makes when the bow is drawn.

Some advice that I haven't seen posted yet is to find an archery shop operated by folks you can trust - even if you've got to drive 100 miles to find one. From your initial post, it seems as if you don't really trust the sales people where you've been going. YOU WILL need hands-on help from a competent bow technician from time to time. This is especially true while you are getting started. Good luck and good hunting.
 

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Was at BassPro's catalog clearance shop last week (Friday), and they had a huge rack of bows they had labeled as "reconditioned". Most looked brand new. There was a variety of brands - including some that I consider good makes and models. They clearance shop price is already a pretty decent deal - but they had a special going on (I would assume still going on?) that was 40% off the clearance price.

Had I had some cash, I would have come home with a new bow.

So - if you are going to be in Springfield any time soon, I would go by and check. They also have quite a few accessories including releases, sights, and other goodies at good prices as well.
 

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3-D Shoots

Get involved with your local Archery club, 95% of the shooters will be hunters also that have been there and done that and they will be able to help you along the way. Also is a good way to practice and have fellowship with other hunters. If you enjoy shooting your compound after a few years, try traditional shooting it is a blast.

P.S. If you are not hunting in the mountains don't forget your THERMACELL
 

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Keep it simple. Enjoy it for what it is. Dont put to much into results at first. Basic cobra sights, sims stablizer, Vapor blackhawk arrows and you are set up with guality equipment at a good price. Go with a loop. Save you money in the long run and are best with dropaway arrowrest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It's not that I don't trust the local archery shop...

From your initial post, it seems as if you don't really trust the sales people where you've been going.
It's just that I wanted to be cautious:skeptical:.

I actually met the guy yesterday at the local shop and he seems very knowledgeable and helpful. He is going to get me fixed up and ready to hunt.:smokin:

I have talked to a few people and they seem to trust him.

This is great advice.

Thanks again.
 

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i have been bowhunting for quite a while. i feel like i have fine tuned my setup, to be about the most efficient hunting rig, not 3d, that i could possibly have. i will share my setup with you. some may not think its the best, but it sure works for me.

a good modern bow, shooting close to 300 fps, with carbon arrows, and 100 grain heads, should be able to shoot flat enough to only need one pin, out to 30 or 35 yards.

Browning F5 Tornado, with a draw weight of 72lbs

arrows, Gold Tip XT Hunters, around 27.5 inches long.

Whisker Biscuit arrow rest. this is, in my opinion the best "hunting" rest ever built. when in a treestand, you dont have to worry at all about your arrow falling off the rest. you can lay it across your lap or whatever.

2'' Blazer Vanes, with Blazer wraps. these short vanes have very good flight, and are not affected at all by the bristles on the whisker biscuit, like 4'' vanes are. the reason for the wraps are, the vanes seem to adhere better than to the bare shaft, and they look cool too!

100 grain NAP Spitfire Mechanical broadheads. i swear by these things. they fly just like field points, and leave an excellent wound channel. i have had complete pass throughs on every deer i have shot, except for two spine shots. i bought three of these heads in 1999, and am still shooting two of them. the third i lost when i missed a deer, (shooter error) and could not find the arrow. they have practice blades available for them, and a set of refill blades is only about 15 bucks. they have no o rings or washers to keep the blades closed, it uses a thin piece of steel with a "detent" on it to keep them closed.

i have the Sims Limb Savers, and string leeches. they are worth every penny at reducing bow noise.

i like the string loop over the metal d loops. the string can still be torqued with the d loop, but is almost impossible with a string loop. also, the d loops are heavier, and on drastically reflexed bows, the can actually make the string fly forward enough to strike the shooters wrist. (seen it, pse baby g)

a caliper release with a wrist strap is what i use. strap it on and it is always right there. i use a cobra, but there are many to choose from. get one with an adjustable trigger, and you can get as sweet a pull as your favorite rifle.

peep sights, keep it simple. something that is easy to see through, lets in enough light, and turns the same every time. i use the ones that have three slots for the string.

sights, as much as you want to spend. i am still using a cheapo cobra fiber optic 3 pin sight, but my buddy MO HUNTER just bought a trophy ridge vertical in line sight, and i now have sight pin envy. we shot last night right before dark, and his pins looked like l.e.d. lights compared to mine.

get a good dampening type stabilizer, but not one that is real long. Sims makes a good one, i use an NAP Shokblocker.

with this setup, my pins are, top pin, 0 to 35 yds, second pin 45 yards, third pin 55 yards. 65 yards is third pin on top of the deers back. now before the ethics police nab me, i practice all summer at 45 to 65 yards, so 30 yarders are like throwing rocks in the ocean, you cant miss. shooting at long distances during practice sessions ensure that you will fine tune your form to shoot consistent groups at that distance.

hope this helps you, and good luck, BG12
i love everything about this set-up but the whisker buscuit... ive had 2 buddies who have used them during the season and had the buscuit actually freeze on them which obiviously made the arrow fly diffrent but other then that i love this set-up...now the broadheads i cant complain about every hunter has his favorite...mine would be the rage 2 blade which leave and AWSOME blood trail to follow and they also come with a practice mechanical tip to shoot
 
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