Motor swap

Discussion in 'Trucks and Cars' started by Bigism, May 18, 2017.

  1. Bigism

    Bigism Member

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    Anyone ever swapped a 5.7 hemi out to a 5.9 cummins ?? It's a 2006 mega cab 4wd !!
     
  2. DuckLn

    DuckLn Well-Known Member

    Cumminsforum dot com and go to third generation trucks sub forum. You're better off sellin the gas burner and buyin a diesel if you need one.
     

  3. In my opinion, you're better off keeping the gas burner....
     
  4. Bigism

    Bigism Member

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    Why do you think that if I may ask ??
     
  5. Everything about diesel is more expensive, and in the end the only good thing about diesel is that you have better pulling power down low in the revs.
     
  6. Bigism

    Bigism Member

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    Makes sense ,, but what about the better mpg you'll get with the diesel ?? I'm only getting around 12.8 mpg in my gas burner which sucks to me when I know guys that are getting around 19-23 in the diesel...
     
  7. Everyone "says" they're getting 23-24-30-40 MPG. I drive an '06 Ram 5.9 diesel at one of my jobs. Megacab 4x4, 172,400 miles as of today. Likely be over 200k by end of the summer. Anyway, best I've seen is 17.2 unloaded and with a load (typically 6200-7000 lbs) behind it, about 12.9 on average, all highway until I have to bail off and stop for fuel, or make a delivery, and I try to keep it under 65 mph when pulling. It doesn't impress me that much. Not when diesel fuel itself costs more, so it washes out-and once you figure in the maintenance and repair costs, it ends up costing more.

    Heavy trucks pulling heavy loads MIGHT see a benefit from the diesel engine, and that's mainly why you see them in 18 wheelers. They also use a 6 cylinder design because an in-frame overhaul is easier therefore faster (remember...time=money) with the inline design, as opposed to a V8, V6, V10, etc.

    One thing I wanted to mention was that another myth is that the cummins has more low end torque. It has a MUCH heavier flywheel (on the manual shift models), which has a ton or two of "stored" energy, which gives it the feeling of having more pulling power from idle to about 1200 RPM. Once past that, it runs almost identical to both of our 7.3's.

    I used to drive a wrecker, briefly. There were 6 trucks. 4 of them were '04 F350's, 6.0. the other two were 05 Dodge 3500's, 5.9. All automatics. The 6.0 would annhiliate the Dodges in a drag race without a load on them. Never raced them with a car on back, mainly because we never had 2 of the same car to compare the trucks. The dodge "felt" more torquey, but when it came down to the end of a drag race, which on that lot was maybe 1/8 mile, the ford's were about 5 truck lengths ahead consistently. Amazed me. 2 of the Ford's are still in service, one has 382,000 and the other has 407,000 last time I heard (couple weeks ago). I actually liked the 6.0's, just scared of them for personal use since I don't have a ton of time and money to have to fix one. Spoke with my old boss recently and he said it's getting time to replace the trucks, and he says he's considering the new F350's based on how well the old ones have serviced the fleet. But I know how it is, if he can get a Dodge for $40k and the cheapest Ford is $70k, he's gonna get the Fiat. Business is business.

    My 03 PSD 7.3 averages 18.1 if I keep the speed under 62mph on the freeways and it better be flat to get that good. With the right wind and the right conditions-on summer fuel (winter fuel gets poorer fuel economy), I can get 20 mpg but it's really rare. With the race car behind it, 12.2, averaging 48 mph. Brother has exactly the same truck as mine, 03 CCSB, but his is a V10 gas burner, and his towing MPG is 10.7. Unloaded about 13. And it's a LOT faster than my old oil burner is. I mean a LOT faster.

    The MPG stuff we hear and read about is not always true....especially the "younger" folks who can't keep their foot off the floor, and when the truck by itself weighs nearly 8000 lbs, it's hard to drive it "easy". My F250 is 7928. Just had it on the scale Monday, and that was with under 1/4 tank of fuel. It holds 28 gallons.
     
  8. ozarkthunder

    ozarkthunder Well-Known Member

    When i retire in a few years i am considering a 3/4 ton or bigger truck.I am thinking about a gas burner for the exact reasons you explained.Service, repair, fuel & initial investment, plus i do not think my wife would adapt to a diesel very well, has me considering this.
     
  9. Bigism

    Bigism Member

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    Well that's really a good example an I agree the cost is more !! I had a 6.7 for a while an would still have it but I was talked into trading it off an wish I still had it !!
     
  10. Bigism

    Bigism Member

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    ImageUploadedByArkansas Hunting1496095018.950662.jpg

    This is my average in my 2006 mega cab 4c4 !! It sucks in my opinion but I love the room!!
     
  11. DuckLn

    DuckLn Well-Known Member

    Its work drivin a truck that heavy! My 2005 quad cab 4x4 5.9 would get 18-20 mpgs highway with factory tires on it and a smarty junior programmer. I had the catalytic converter cut off but i sold it in hopes of finding a manual tranny version of the same truck and never did.