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Anyone know how to get to this place? I hunt Sylamore a lot but not this area. I am looking for walk in only access to go scout for black powder season. I have looked all over online and can't find anything about it.
 

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Anyone know how to get to this place? I hunt Sylamore a lot but not this area. I am looking for walk in only access to go scout for black powder season. I have looked all over online and can't find anything about it.
Look up the National Geographic Trails Illustrated Buffalo National River East map. They're about $12, but a pretty decent topo of the area. Leatherwood is clearly marked on it.

You can also get a USGS topo of it. I know Tim Ernst sells them on his website. They're about 10 bucks. I like the NG map better myself.

But basically it's bounded on the South by Rand Rd, on the East by Push Mt Road (Hwy 341) and Brushy Creek road. On the North and West by the Buffalo National Park.

There are a few private withholdings in the wilderness area. Those folks are allowed to drive to their land, and use the road just south of the lookout tower on Push Mt Rd. So if you park by the gate on that road, don't block it.
 

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Call or go by the U.S. Forest Service Office in Mt. View, or the Forest Supervisor, in Russellville, AR and request a free map of the Leatherwood area. The area is "walk in" or "horse back" only, therefore some really big bucks are in the area. Lots of steep, rugged country with limited cell phone service. I hunted there for several years before it was designated as wilderness.
Even then it was a lot of hard work to get a deer out to a vehicle. Don't go in there unless you are in really good physical shape and you have a good backup plan.

Saw the buck of a life time there before it was closed to vehicles.
US Forest Service, Mtn. View, 870-269-3228. Good Luck!
:up:
 

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It is steep. I have been in there a little. There are some pretty racks on the grown bucks in Sylamore. I drug 1 out once when I was young and in good shape. I haven't been back.
 

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When I hunted Sylamore I went before season when squirrel season opened and walked and scouted till I found deer sign. There were vast areas that didn't have deer sign. Mostly the easy to get to places. When I went in and walked downhill into a hollow below the road I found deer and there were deer in those places every year I hunted there.
 

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You can go down Brush Creek road or Rand road and look for places. The bad thang is it will usually be an uphill drag. You probably already know this, but it is dang steep over there. I finally got where I quarter them up and backpack them out.
 

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Hardly over hunted in the backwoods places, especially around Big Creek. even when it had a road down there it was very remote. Only locals ever went down there, and there were never many locals. Most deer die of old age down there. Drive through Cozahome to a place called "wobbling rock", park just above it and walk down, easy walk down but a killer walk up. Without a mule or horse, one would have to quarter a deer to get it out. Lots of old corn fields were around Big Creek, and its mouth. An old community was once down there. Now those fields are all in "Old field" status and very thickety with cool and warm season grasses in open areas. Lots of plum thickets, blackberry and persimmons. Some old Kiefer pear trees if you can find them. Find a saddle where hardwoods meet old field edges or an overlooking bench, and you will see deer. Lots of big old white oaks in the woods. Best to go with one or two buddies and backpack for a few days. Not a place to go alone, cause if you get lost or hurt, you would be in a really bad spot. I used to own part of the big creek valley at and around what was called Loonbeam Hole. Even back then there were places in the more remote hills and hollers where no one had been since the Indians. Now even more remote as much of it takes about a five mile bush whack. So, not over hunted hunted, rather, simply put, not hunted.
 

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Thanks for the advice guys. It is just the kind of place for me. I have gone out and scouted twice since I posted. I am very excited about what I have found. I have done a lot of backpack hunting in California and Alaska. I am going to treat this place the same way. Pack in for 5 days and hunt. Any deer I shoot will be taken out in pieces in my backpack. I am giong to be bow hunting and muzzleloading by myself. My buddy is comming down from Kansas and we are going to spend a few days back there to try and get him a buck. It will be his first deer hunt. I will post pics of success(if I have worked hard enough to get it).
 

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Look on a map of Big Creek which runs into the Buffalo River. About a mile up from the mouth of Big Creek, you will see a big horseshoe bend. The neck of the horseshoe is extremely narrow. That neck is a perfect place to camp. as you can cross the creek in both directions or hunt the ridge running on that side of the creek. That area is where the old overgrown fields are, one in the middle of the horseshoe and others on the other side of the creek towards the buffalo. Several old cabins and an old stone school house down there.

If you can scout at all, and I am sure you can, you will find the deer and their trails. If you go, take along an ultralite rod with clear, low visability 4-6# line, and some grubs and lures. It is nothing to catch 50-100 small mouth per day. There are deer down there which have never seen a human. I owned that land before the Govt took it away, prettiest place in the world. The fat part of the horseshoe is where Loonbeam hole is, a great camping spot on the gravel bar there. If you camp on those gravel bars watch out for flash floods it it rains a lot.
 

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Yes. after they took it I used to back pack down there several times a year. Hardly a rock i did not walk on. Now a days I would have no problem going down but getting back up might be an issue for this old long in the tooth guy. We used to have a 12X24 one room cabin down there and would spend months living like Indians. It was a great time. But I am glad it is preserved for posterity. A most special place. Probably the wildest place left in the in the Southwest and Eastern part of the US. Took my kids down there every summer back packing after it was a park. Taught them things about the wilderness and living off the land that folks just do not learn today. But be careful if anyone goes, If you get hurt of lost, well you are down there, and totally on your own. Maybe the high Rockies or Alaska are wilder, but not many other places. Never believed much in ghosts until I hung out there, but things happened one night once after digging up some Indian stuff that convinced me. Tread lightly and treat the place with the respect that it deserves Once when fly fishing I got treed by a bunch of razorback hogs. Most wondered off but a big black bore did not want to leave, stayed in that tree for about an hour. Worst part, I broke my fly rod.
 

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One place, I found in the Wilderness Area on a tributary, was a Beaver Dam that was about 80 yards long and at least 16 ft. high. I must have spent two hours just gazing at this super natural beaver dam. I have wondered many times if it was still there. :up:
 

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I know this is an old thread, but it's the most informative I have found about the area. I plan to turkey hunt Sylamore and Buffalo National WMAs this Spring and want to get into some remote areas to find less pressured birds. Would it be feasible to kayak the Buffalo from where it meets the White down to the mouth of Big Creek? My hunt will be mid-April. I'm all for adventure, but I only have two days to scout and three to hunt, so I don't want to spend more time fighting the river than I do hunting turkeys.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but it's the most informative I have found about the area. I plan to turkey hunt Sylamore and Buffalo National WMAs this Spring and want to get into some remote areas to find less pressured birds. Would it be feasible to kayak the Buffalo from where it meets the White down to the mouth of Big Creek? My hunt will be mid-April. I'm all for adventure, but I only have two days to scout and three to hunt, so I don't want to spend more time fighting the river than I do hunting turkeys.
You would be paddling upstream in the Buffalo. Big Creek meets the Buffalo upstream of the White/Buffalo intersection. Unless you are a heck of a paddler...

During Spring, you should be able to motor up the Buffalo to Big Creek though assuming water is high enough. It usually is during that time of year.
 

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You would be paddling upstream in the Buffalo. Big Creek meets the Buffalo upstream of the White/Buffalo intersection. Unless you are a heck of a paddler...

During Spring, you should be able to motor up the Buffalo to Big Creek though assuming water is high enough. It usually is during that time of year.
I kayaked and motored that stretch last year and you'd have to be a heck of a kayaker to do that. I'm assuming you'd put in at Buffalo City. The other thing is you'd be doing a buttload of straight up climbing just to get to where you'd hear a bird. You aren't going to hear many while down in the Buffalo.
 
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