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I havent fish with jiggs much. There was a good thread about colors, but I was wondering about favorite techinque. Do you use a rod, pole, cork, spinner, or what?
 

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I use a 12 ft telescopic pole with a little reel and 4 lb line and tight-line 'em without a cork if I'm fishing reeds or trees or brushpiles.

If I'm fishing grass or flats I use a 6ft ultralite spinning combo and 6lb line with a slip float and cast and twitch, cast and twitch.
 

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I havent fish with jiggs much. There was a good thread about colors, but I was wondering about favorite techinque. Do you use a rod, pole, cork, spinner, or what?
We use jiggin poles. Sometimes we use a cork if it's really windy out, but most of the time we just feel the bite without a cork.

Usually we fish the jig about 1-3 feet down under the surface. Crappie will feed "up" but won't feed "down" like a bass might. If you put the bait above em you're in better shape than if it's below them.

I haven't had much luck for any kind of crappie with any kinda flashy spinner. In most of my fishing instances, the less "action" a lure has the more likely a crappie is going to hit it.

Also, if you're jigging, make sure that your bait is presented "horizontally" and not "vertically." You can achieve this by tying your knot, and then sliding it to the side facing the jig hook. Your bait should hang and stay parallel to the ground...a vertical jig looks unnatural to crappie and can make the difference between a catch and a long boring day...

Good luck, hope I helped.
 

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12ft telescopic pole with 4# test although my boy uses a cork set at the same depth I fish and usually does well:thumb:
 

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I fish jigs 99.99 % of the time for Crappie. I use a 12'2'' Buck's graphite jig pole with 4 or 6 lb test line. Fishing verticle over brush or stake beds most of the year. I like a heavy jig so I can feel the cover and work every piece. My favorite is a 2'' unbrella tube with 1/8 th oz leadhead inside. We catch most of ours down in the cover most of the year. Sometimes they suspend over it. But during bright sun or after a cold front they may be right on the bottom.







 

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Let the fish show you what technique to use. If crappie are holding tight to cover and not wanting to chase anything, then keeping the bait in the strike zone is the deal. Using a nice B'n'M pole (10 or 12 feet, whichever you prefer) and crappie reel with line in the mid-single digits to 10 or 12 pound test will do the trick. You can tightline, but keep a forefinger on the line to add a little feel for the lightest taps. This method is also sometimes effective when adding a cork bobber. Some folks call it a float and fly technique. If the fish want to chase, you can go no float or float. Without a float, you a basically swimming the bait - sometimes stopping, dropping, bouncing - along near the bottom or some structure. With a float, you are swinging the jig above the fish and allowing the bobber to swim it back in place. Strikes can often comes when the jig is motionless in this method. Plus, the bobber can act as a fish attractant by jerking it along similar to an old Lucky 13. As for colors, I like black/chartreuse, black/firetail and red/chartreuse for clear to stained water. Blue/pearl is good in muddy water. Size depends on where you are. I use 1/32 oz. or 1/16 oz. generally, but bigger baits may be needed in current or when trying to use larger plastics for the slabs. I also like some of the shad imitation jig tails and occasionally will still tie on a marabou jig in white, black, olive or black/brown.
 
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