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I'm 38 years old. My Dad is 73 and tells of wild hogs way back when he was a kid. I grew up in Norfok, and had the Sylamore WMA as my playground when I was a kid.

I've done a lot of hunting, spent a lot of time in the woods. Maybe 3-4 years back, my Dad started seeing wild hog sign in the Mtns (Leatherwoods). I know people started shooting a few about the same time. I know a year ago we found sign in areas we didn't 2 years ago.

This spring, there is now sign almost everywhere we go.

from a web site

The wild pig is the most prolific large wild mammal in North America. Given adequate nutrition, a wild pig population can double in just 4 months. Feral hogs may begin to breed before 6 months of age, if they have a high-quality diet. Sows can produce 2 litters per year and young may be born at any time of the year
read that again, because what I saw this turkey season was big tracks, and a bunch of little tiny tracks - sows and piglets. In 12 months, if something isn't done, whee will we be?


In 5 years, where will we be ? Hogs out eating deer and turkey? Don't they compete for the same food sources ?

I like wild hogs to eat. I think they're cool to have around to hunt - on the surface, and in a controlled population way but is it possible to control them?



http://www.topnews.in/australias-hog-population-more-its-human-population-22567

Official estimates suggest there are now 23 million feral pigs in Australia, outnumbering the continent's human population of 21 million.
Wow
 

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A guy said he saw some here in the ouachita's this year. I hope we don't get them here but I'm afraid they're coming. I like being able to drive not very far and have pigs to hunt without actually having them where I deer and turkey hunt.
 

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Feral hogs should be hunted year round just like coyotes, bobcats, foxes and raccoons should. All these animals are turkey eating machines whether the eggs or the birds. We have got to do something other than cutting turkey season and moving it so late that the gobble is gone. Thankfully I have not seen any pig sign in the Winona area but the other animal sign is everywhere. I have hunted Winona 4 times and have yet to hear a gobble. Sign is in all the places I have been but not a gobble since three weeks before season. I have seen sign of pigs on Camp Robinson. I have killed 5 pigs this year down south and wish it would have been 50. They are a pest to say the least.
 

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In order to keep it from becoming and epidemic the AGFC needs to crack down all those that catch pigs and haul them somewhere else and let them go. We have had more pigs this year than any year in the past, and we killed more than any year in the past. Three years ago they were not a problem, then someone obviously turned some loose somewhere, and everyone is over run by them all the sudden

Like live2hunt said, once you got them, you can't get rid of them. Pretty sure they reproduce faster than rabbits. I used to be not big on the idea of shooting them and feeding the flys and worms, but I am pretty much all for it until the population drops down
 

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it may not be sportman like... but I say shoot them and let them lay if you dont have a means/time to mess with them.. they will ruin your deer hunting and I have always heard they will kill turkeys and young deer.
 

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These domestic hogs gone wild degrade wildlife habitat and private property, compete with native wildlife for food, and can pose a threat to humans, pets and domestic livestock through the spread of disease.

Just like their domestic cousins, feral hogs spend a lot of time rooting and wallowing. This behavior contributes to soil erosion, reduces water quality and damages agricultural crops and hay fields. It also destroys sensitive natural areas such as glades, fens and springs.

Hogs have a keen sense of smell and are opportunistic feeders. They forage heavily on acorns, competing with native species such as deer and turkeys for this important fall food. They commonly eat the eggs of ground nesting-birds and have been reported to kill and eat fawns.

In other states, feral hogs are known to carry diseases such as swine brucellosis, pseudo-rabies, trichinosis and leptospirosis
 

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Feral hog populations compete with resident deer and turkey populations for limited resources. Feral hogs are omnivorous and feed on a wide variety of items, many of which are staples for native fauna (Wood and Roark, 1980; Scott and Pelton, 1975; Baber and Coblentz, 1987). Thus, feral hog feeding activities can have a negative effect on the availability of food resources for both livestock and wildlife (Everitt and Alaniz, 1978 and 1980).
One of the more important seasonal food item types for feral hogs is fruit/nut crops, especially oak mast (Wood and Roark, 1980). Oak mast is also an important food source for deer and turkey. When feral hogs actively compete for mast food (Yarrow, 1987), resident deer and turkey may enter the winter with deficient fat reserves.

The pig has an advantage over deer and turkey in using oak mast. While deer and turkey feed primarily by sight and are limited to what is visible, the hog uses its keen sense of smell to locate the fallen crop. Thus, pigs have the ability to more thoroughly deplete an area of the mast than deer of turkey could do (Ray, 1988). Also, because the hog is omnivorous, it is able to switch to other available food items (e.g., roots) once mast is depleted (Scott and Pelton, 1975).

Evidence that feral hogs compete with deer and turkey for food is demonstrated at automatic deer and turkey feeders. The TADCS annually receives reports from deer hunting operations that feral hogs consume corn placed out to bait deer and that the hogs' activities cause deer to avoid the feeders.
 

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The #3 bowkill deer in Arkansas was killed in pond Creek NWR.And there are tons of Hogs down there.On a good day riding through there, You can see 30 ,40 deer in the gravel road,and in the ditch eating grass.I think the deer will adapt.
Also there are turkeys by the hundreds.
 

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The AGFC needs to address this problem. I still think that this is the number one problem facing game animals in this state, and we don't hear anything from the agency charged with protecting and regulating the game animal population.

I can tell you from first hand experience that the AGFC doesn't have any idea how to proceed with the hog problem. Thier official policy is that you can hunt hugs on private property year round 24 hours a day. But you have to dig to find this information and the enforcement officers are told to write tickets to anyone they find with a light and a gun at night. The enforcement officer that wrote my citation told the chief of enforcement, after I contacted him about our situation, that we didn't have a hog problem on our lease! Our lease is in Dallas County. Does anyone believe that a lease in southern Arkansas doesn't have hogs on it?!?

The AGFC is too concerned with poachers to ever realize the potential devastation that hogs bring to this state. Everyone needs to force feed them this problem. Don't let them let this hog situation get out of control more than it already is!! MAKE THEM ADDRESS THIS!!!
 

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I don't know about epidemic but they are a big problem. On my leases they are a problem. I seek out hog hunters to try and control them.
My members like to take a few but enough to control them well enough.

It apperently is a problem in many areas because timber companies are starting to address the problem. Here is a link to a thread I started recently in reference to Deltics policy.......http://www.arkansashunting.net/showthread.php?t=34455



I am considering recruiting some more dedicated hoggers this year to try and help reduce the number a little more.
 

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I hunted in Howard county a couple of years ago and we saw signs every few yards (wallers, rubs, etc). I was in a tree stand before dark and had a HERD of them things come up underneath me. There was one huge boar, 6 sows each having about eight younguns on her. The old boar caught me trying to lower my gun and off they went. They are truly tearing things up. My folks live around Northfork lake, and they are having problems with little hogs tearing things up. This is the first year they have come that far east of the lake. Mom said they are eating her garden, Dad said it is about bacon time.
Sportsmanetc
 

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My friends and I have been hunting Sylamore wma for over 25 yrs and had not seen a hog until this last deer season. The forest folks told us to kill every one we see.
That's just it. The Forestry folks and the AGFC folks will always tell you to kill everyone you see but place so many restrictions on how you can do it that it isn't feasible or efficient at eliminating a nuisance animal population that grows as fast as feral hogs. They are too worried about not making rules that would give poachers an excuse to be in the woods, yet they are going to allow a population of hogs to grow to the point that they directly and severely impact our game animals populations. The regulatory agencies in this state are going to have to face this fact soon if they are to do anything proactive to stop it....
 
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