Arkansas Hunting banner
21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,427 Posts
I used to plant all kinds of things - but that is usually more costly and labor intensive. For a variety of reasons - hogs being one of the main ones, and planting a lot of acres, I ended up with clover and wheat. They compliment each other. The clover fixes nitrogen for the wheat - I dont fertilize anymore, either. I can leave the seeder on one setting because I plant the same thing in all my deer plots. The clover typically is burned down from heat and drought, so the wheat provides a quick green up to hunt over. The clover is at its best in the summer, providing a high protein food source for the does with fawns and the bucks growing their antlers.

The clover plots did something else on my place, too. More important than anything else. One of the noted private biologist so called deer experts was cautioning about creating “doe factories”. Now this guy lives up in a northern deer state where they have problems with too many deer. He said planting clover tended to hold does with their fawns in one area because the clover was high in protein and the doe would stay and feed in one plot all summer. And about half the doe fawns will remain with the doe - which just keeps building the doe population in that area.

I thought, that is exactly what I want to do - build my doe population. And what he said is exactly what I see. I have a food plot 400 yards down the ridge from the house. That food plot has a group of does that live around it all year. 600 yards from the other plot, is another clover food plot - and it has a group of does that is completely different than the group 400 yards from my house. I am very familiar with these two groups of does because I see them almost daily. I have similar groups of does in every food plot that is at least two acres in size. I have a few smaller food plots, but I cant say they are the center of activity for a doe group. Those 1/2 and 1 acre food plots get used all summer, but I cant really identify a specific family of does using them. But it seems the food plots of two acres or larger will become the center of life for a group of does. I have a seven acre wheat clover food plot where there is a big group of does calling their home. Maybe 12 in all. I dont see them on a daily basis so I am not as familiar with them. I attribute the doe factory concept along with the clover to be the single most important thing I did to re-establish my deer herd after we killed them out to “balance the herd”.

I cant grow peas or beans or sunflowers or milo because my deer and hog density wont allow it. I’ve had a LOT of deer using a clover plot and not kill it out. Hogs graze clover, but they dont root it too bad. Clover, while seemingly expensive when you buy it, because it can come back year after year, is probably the cheapest seed there is. I have a small spot of Imperial Whitetail clover I planted twelve years ago. I abandoned the plot. I have sprayed it numerous time with round up. It has been flooded for several weeks at a time - and it still persists.

Clover is the heart of my deer management - and in particular - durana clover - but I think any clover that persists through the summer will do the job.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,427 Posts
Destination clover blend from merit seed
This is a good clover mix for those who want a mix. Since Merit Seed does indicate what clovers are included in the mix, a person may well go to their local seed store and buy seed by the pound and save a ton of money. Some times, convenience outweighs price, though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,435 Posts
I used to plant all kinds of things - but that is usually more costly and labor intensive. For a variety of reasons - hogs being one of the main ones, and planting a lot of acres, I ended up with clover and wheat. They compliment each other. The clover fixes nitrogen for the wheat - I dont fertilize anymore, either. I can leave the seeder on one setting because I plant the same thing in all my deer plots. The clover typically is burned down from heat and drought, so the wheat provides a quick green up to hunt over. The clover is at its best in the summer, providing a high protein food source for the does with fawns and the bucks growing their antlers.

The clover plots did something else on my place, too. More important than anything else. One of the noted private biologist so called deer experts was cautioning about creating “doe factories”. Now this guy lives up in a northern deer state where they have problems with too many deer. He said planting clover tended to hold does with their fawns in one area because the clover was high in protein and the doe would stay and feed in one plot all summer. And about half the doe fawns will remain with the doe - which just keeps building the doe population in that area.

I thought, that is exactly what I want to do - build my doe population. And what he said is exactly what I see. I have a food plot 400 yards down the ridge from the house. That food plot has a group of does that live around it all year. 600 yards from the other plot, is another clover food plot - and it has a group of does that is completely different than the group 400 yards from my house. I am very familiar with these two groups of does because I see them almost daily. I have similar groups of does in every food plot that is at least two acres in size. I have a few smaller food plots, but I cant say they are the center of activity for a doe group. Those 1/2 and 1 acre food plots get used all summer, but I cant really identify a specific family of does using them. But it seems the food plots of two acres or larger will become the center of life for a group of does. I have a seven acre wheat clover food plot where there is a big group of does calling their home. Maybe 12 in all. I dont see them on a daily basis so I am not as familiar with them. I attribute the doe factory concept along with the clover to be the single most important thing I did to re-establish my deer herd after we killed them out to “balance the herd”.

I cant grow peas or beans or sunflowers or milo because my deer and hog density wont allow it. I’ve had a LOT of deer using a clover plot and not kill it out. Hogs graze clover, but they dont root it too bad. Clover, while seemingly expensive when you buy it, because it can come back year after year, is probably the cheapest seed there is. I have a small spot of Imperial Whitetail clover I planted twelve years ago. I abandoned the plot. I have sprayed it numerous time with round up. It has been flooded for several weeks at a time - and it still persists.

Clover is the heart of my deer management - and in particular - durana clover - but I think any clover that persists through the summer will do the job.
I'm about to sow my bottom land plots next month and was curious if the flood hurts the clover? It wouldn't stay on very long because I focused those plots mostly on the island part, but occasionally it will get covered.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,427 Posts
I'm about to sow my bottom land plots next month and was curious if the flood hurts the clover? It wouldn't stay on very long because I focused those plots mostly on the island part, but occasionally it will get covered.
It depends on when the clover is inundated. My clover has stayed underwater for three weeks in the winter an been fine. It was under water for three weeks in the summer and killed it dead as a hammer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,435 Posts
I didn’t know exactly how this clover would do in the snow but it’s been tremendously good. Deer would scrape the snow back to eat. One has to look at a poor time of the year like right now and ask themselves what can I feed and still provide protein. Clover to me is that answer.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top