Extremely confused

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by carbonelement, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. Last week I moved my camera to try and find where my BIG buck was getting in and out of his bedding area. Well, I went out this morning to get the memory stick and move it to a new location. While I was getting it I noticed some rubs I did not see when I was putting the camera up. I thought that I had possibly just overlooked them when I put it up. Well, I was wrong. I have pics of a SMALL 8 point making new rubs yesterday Dec 15th. I've never seen activity like that this late. Have I just always over looked it and this is normal? Or is things just that messed up this year? I honestly am really lost on this one.
     
  2. mossyhorn

    mossyhorn Well-Known Member

    i have seen deer make rubs throughout the year. Just cause they arnt in rut doensnt mean they dont try marking their teritory. that my 2 cents
     

  3. well thanks for your two cents. Honestly I did not know. I thought that was just rut activity. Thanks mossy.
     
  4. kelly5758

    kelly5758 Well-Known Member

    We are still seeing fresh rubs and small bucks are still scrapping.
     
  5. coonnutz

    coonnutz Well-Known Member

    I think rubs are how they scratch their head as well, I don't think just because there's a rub it's because their still rutting, could be wrong though.
     
  6. BullDog

    BullDog Well-Known Member

    Most of the Big Bucks i have killed and seen killed in Arkansas have all been in Dec and Jan. I have seen lots of bucks chasing in Dec and Jan. One of my friends killed a mid 140 11pt last weekend and he was chasing a doe.
     
  7. AR_deerslayer

    AR_deerslayer Well-Known Member

    x2
     
  8. SR4

    SR4 Super Member<br>'07/'08 Bowhunting Contest Team Wi

    x3
     
  9. deertrax

    deertrax Well-Known Member

    280
    19
    benton
    A buck will make rubs as long as they have antlers on their heads. The testosterone level is still there until the antlers shed. You guys need to understand that the "rut" is not a small window. A buck is capable of breeding from the time his velvet rubs off until he sheds.

    Some folks report scrapes in March and April, this us generally due to a short peak in testosterone levels that allow the growth of antlers to begin. This usually lasts a very short period.

    So, a buck is in "rut" from the time he sheds velvet until he sheds antlers. It is the doe through her heat period that causes the "rut" to intensify.

    Also, as the testosterone level in the buck increases, so does the aggressive behavior toward other bucks. A lot of this behavior is the cause of rubbing, scraping, and other buck activities.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2010
  10. deertrax

    deertrax Well-Known Member

    280
    19
    benton
    A little more info on the rut for you fellas.

    The estrous cycle of the doe is the cause for the peak of the rut. This cycle is impacted by the phase of the moon. The cycle is on a 28 day cycle, if not bred the first go round, she will continue to come into heat until successfully bred. This is the reason for a lot of late fawns, that and the fact that the previous years fawns will come into estrous at around 6 months of age, putting some of the late born fawns coming into heat later than others.
    Being on a lunar cycle, this is also why some times the heat cycle is earlier or later in a season than some.

    This is also the reason for the different rut periods. Typically, northern deer herds have an earlier rut. This is due to the fact that to survive in a colder climate, the young need a longer growing season, thus earlier birth equals bigger and stronger in the winter.

    When the deer herd in Arkansas was nearly extinguished in the early part of the last century, they were restocked with animals from more northern latitudes than Arkansas. There were some areas in the state that kept some of the natural deer. These are the areas that typically have a later rut, like Wattensaw and other areas in the White River Drainage. These area still have a lot of the natural southern state rut, much like Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, etc.

    When a doe is moved from her natural area, she will retain the same rut date that she was born with and will pass this down to her fawns. This is why the rut in areas of the nation that deer were restocked is skewed and why as you go north, the rut progresses differently, earlier than natural herds in the south.


    In the equatorial regions of South America where there are white tail deer, there are bucks that are shedding antlers and some that are just shedding velvet. There is no defined rut in these ares as the local conditions are always good for raising fawns, thus breeding takes place year round in these areas.
     
  11. Nuge Fan

    Nuge Fan Well-Known Member

    good info deertrax, thanks
     
  12. woodsnwater

    woodsnwater Well-Known Member

    Well I was wondering. I seen fresh rubs out by the house hey other day and last weekend I saw several fresh rubs. Also, seen bucks following does, but yet not chasing. I went out and set my reflectors and get my bearings of location. During this time I found some fresh scrapes. I have some say it's not quiet over and some say it is. I don't know. I also have nit seen an muck activity and I have stayed in the woods. Right place at the wrong I guess. Go figure. I also came across someones else's flagging during this time. The paths met. So, if your on this forum and we cross paths I am not trying to hunt on top of you and if we are too close then I'll move. You had the spot before I did.:thumb:
     
  13. dsmtuner1

    dsmtuner1 Well-Known Member

    I see fresh rubs at camp robinson up until February 28th, never fails.

    Thanks deertrax for the info.
     
  14. deertrax, thanks for the info. I have learned something new today. I appreciate it, honestly I do.
     
  15. bowtime

    bowtime Member<br>2011 Turkey Contest Winner<br>2011-2012

    I am seeing more fresh scrapes and rubs right now than I have seen in Ar.all Fall..
     
  16. gotyacovered

    gotyacovered Well-Known Member

    i saw a 3.5 year old shooter checking does tuesday evening.
     
  17. I was just coming home from doing some work in the chicken houses. My wife and I watched a nice shooter buck (in my book) trying to mount a doe.
     
  18. MatthewsMan

    MatthewsMan Well-Known Member

    This is one of the most helpful posts i've read. Thanks deertrax. I have hunted three times in the last 2 weeks and the only time that i've seen activity was the day before my first hunt when I put out some more corn. They were all over the place. There are two fresh/semi-fresh rubs close to my stand but it seems that they are out of their 28 day cycle at the moment. Maybe things will pick up after Christmas. I'm in NWA by the way. Does anyone up this way see anything similar or any pattern change in the last few weeks?
     
  19. MatthewsMan

    MatthewsMan Well-Known Member

    ...forgot to ask as well...if the deer have potential to breed still what does that mean for calling? grunting? bleating? rattling? Thanks to anyone who has input! I really need to kill something!
     
  20. boomer

    boomer Well-Known Member

    Having known deertrax for years and hunted with him on many occasions I can tell you he has a large amount of knowledge on the subject. His info is spot on.

    As far as calling goes, it can be effective year around. Deer are vocal and social critters. You just have to match the season. Deer behave differently at different times. The majority of the breeding has been done so the aggressive rattling and grunting that most think of as "calling" will be less effective. Not to say it wont work because if you can catch a buck in the right mood he will respond to your calling the way you might see on the hunting shows. Less aggressive calling or even social calling may work better.

    BOOM