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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if any of you deer hunters had a source of info on EHD occurrence in Arkansas. A guy I know who has a private high fence area claims he has probably lost about half the deer in the last three or four years. These were not deer brought in from somewhere else - they were native deer fenced in when the fence was built. I asked him if he thought it was affecting the deer outside the fence and he said no doubt - maybe more due to the stress unfenced deer have to endure. He also said some deer farmers he knows have quit the business because of the mortality rates their deer were suffering due to EHD. This is probably worse in the south and east parts of Arkansas, due to the occurrence of the midge that bites the deer and their affinity to swamp/lowland areas. Anybody have any info to enlighten us?
 

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It happens, they get it, no doubt. I'm sure the herd has taken a small hit, that we don't notice. In some states they take a 50% hit with the EHD. I'm not sure how much stress plays in that, since it's from an insect. It probably doesn't help at all.
Where is this fenced place at? I know of one area fenced in, east of McGehee near yellow bend. They were native deer, not brought in, and the man fenced his property.
 

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The 3.5 year old 8 point I killed this year had all 4 hooves re-growing. You could still see the pre-sickness hooves still there barely hanging on and new ones almost filled out. I figure it was EHD since we hunt the flood prone bottoms. We had far fewer deer than normal considering the amount of acorns we had. Even the pigs left after August. I have not seen a pig since August actually and we have had few killed. Not sure if the drought had them all pushed near the river and since that was the water source for all things, bugs and animals, if they were more prone to being infected or not due to sheer numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd say the fence is causing the stress and weakening them so they can't fight it off ... deer are not suppose to be fenced in. Just sayin'
1400 acres under high fence in SW AR. I don't think the deer in that fence are stressed as much as the ones out of the fence on my place. The ones I hunt - there is always a dog running them, they are hunting for food, the high waters are moving them, they are competing with the hogs - and I am chasing them.:thumb:
 

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Deer density has a lot to do with transmission rates from what I've read. Deer farms in particular are susceptable. I'd bet most high fenced areas have a much denser population than outside the fence as well. Think flu and schools/nursing homes.
 

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As stated above, I've heard deer overpopulation contributes to it happening.My thinking is, it is mother nature taking care of her own ??????? I've heard if they do get it you'll find them dead around water, if they do survive it, their hooves will be affected like Tony stated above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For the last two or three years, I have tried to track the doe fawn ratios on my game cams in July, compared with the doe/fawn ratios on my game cams in October. I know this if fairly simplistic, but I believe it has some merit. Typically, over half the fawns have disappeared by October. I was blaming this on coyotes for the most part. I find deer carcasses - but I was attributing those to yote kills. Now, I wonder if it might be EHD. And as far as the deer population in that high fence area - I see more deer outside the fence than inside it - at any rate - it would hardly be classified a deer farm. It is just that the high fence operation has a much more static deer herd than the deer herd on my place. I have a lot of deer right now because there is high water in the bottoms. If there is a good acorn crop - I won't have hardly any deer because they will all be in the bottoms feeding on acorns. Spring flooding can have a devastating affect on the deer using my place. Surrounding land uses can move the deer that I hunt. The high fence area is the same day in and day out. It is like a control area. All those things that affect deer populations on my ground have absolutely no effect within the high fence area. It would be interesting to see the results of spotlight surveys taken in July, compared with those taken in October.
 
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