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I thought it was #2 or larger.
You would have been right until a year or two ago. They reinstated that #2 was legal for turkeys in AR. Scares the bejeebers out of me knowing that someone might shoot me with those! A load of #4's would be bad enough.

Never did hear, or there never was proffered a reason for the change.
 

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It allows those of us who prefer to take body shots of turkeys the oppurtunity. You should see a bird drop when hit with a load of #2 hevi-shot. But yes I agree it can be more dangerous. Works great on predators out to about 50 yards also.
I promise not to start a fight, but I have to ask, why would you choose to body shoot them?

Personally I find it wastes a lot of great meat, that they stand a better chance of getting away (guess #2 might be the answer to that), and that it is just a lot more challenging and fun to shoot them in that bright red and white target God gave them.
 

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Ooops, you're right. I meant to type that, but my fingers don't listen sometimes :smack:
Here's the quote from the AG&F website:
General Regulations

Only shotguns (10 gauge and smaller) and archery equipment (including crossbows) are legal for turkey hunting. The use of modern rifles or pistols; muzzleloading rifles or pistols; shotguns larger than 10 gauge; or shot larger than No. 2 common shot including duplex loads, is prohibited.


You CAN use #2 shot in duplex loads or otherwise.
 

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I think the difference would be that the distances and chokes you use would put fewer pellets into the birds. Turkey hunting, from my perspective, is about tight chokes and putting as many pellets on target as possible.

Of course, I'm coming at it from someone that is against body shooting birds so my perspective is skewed. I would suppose that someone doing that could conceivably shoot a choke that wasn't as tight therefore not putting nearly as many pellets into the body.

I know what I've seen a load of #5's do at 35 yds when a buddy shot one low a couple years ago. We threw away one side of the breast meat and picked pellts out of the other. I can only imagine #2s would be worse. Course I guess one would say that there are fewer of them. Then I would say that they create a bigger wound channel thus overcoming that difference in numbers. And then they could say.....well, you get the idea.

I seriously wasn't trying to stir the pot, I was just curious as to why someone would want to shoot a turkey in the body knowing that it would cause meat loss. Just trying to learn...

I will say, however, that I am against #2's being legal for turkey hunting. For the sole reason that they are much more dangerous in shooting incidints. I'm not trying to make it illegal to body shoot a turkey.
 

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I've hit turkeys dead to rights with #5's, #6's and had them not receive lethal hits. I've had turkeys suddenly find new life as I was walking up on them. Talk about frustating:smack: I've patterned my loads and everything but sometimes you can have holes in the pattern. Also people who don't have a super full choke turkey gun sometimes find this more effective. A good load of #4's works well also, just not as far. I don't see it wasting more meat, the holes are large but spaced apart. I aim for the base of the neck, and haven't had a turkey even twitch since I switched.

You didn't hit them dead to rights or they were too far out of range. With today's loads, or even good old copper plated 6s, anything inside 35 yds is dead meat with a head shot. You have to know your pattern, abilities, and know how far is too far to shoot.
 

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count the number pellets in a 2 ounce #5 , then count them in 2 ounces of 2 shot....I don't see the waste or game or meat being an issue....I do see the safety or us as hunters in the woods getting shot with #2's (OUCH!)

most folks like 6's because they look good on paper (higher pellet count) but not many know that a #5 carries 1/3 more of its energy at 40 yds than a 6...that being said I shoot #5's but I spent alot of time and money to find a shell, shot combo that would put out a consist pattern, not neccessary the best but consist, one that cover the whole target without any holes or gaps...
I'm with you on all that.

I will say that the newer shot out there like Hevi-shot and the Winchester Extended Shot will make those #6's kill like #4's in copperplated lead. Just something to consider.

For what it is worth I shoot Winchester Extendeds in #6 out of a Primos Jellyhead. Took a while to find a combo I was satisfied with, but oh man, does it do the job.
 

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I agree, those Hevi-Shot #6's do a great job, my only complaint is since they are denser than lead, it takes less shot to equal the same amount of lead. That being said, I do love Hevi-Shot and believe the denser shot more than makes up for less pellets in the downrange energy they deliver.
I've found that the fewer pellets make absolutely no difference, as a matter of fact they are much better at patterning. Two reasons...1. less bumb and grind going on as the get down the barrel and out into the shot string. Helps prevent flyers. 2. More velocity holds that shot string together longer providing for tighter patterns.
 
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