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I've been getting multiple coyotes and fox on my cell cam that's still running. More pictures of them than deer now. Anyway, I've gone coyote hunting 2 times with a buddy a few years ago, but that's it. What are your tips for a novice? I think I might give it a go this weekend. Like how long do you call at a spot? Do you leave the call running till something comes in or you decide to leave or only for a little bit then shut off and sit? Being a predator, I assume their nose is really good so I should pay attention to the wind when I set up right? do you camo up as much as you do with say turkey hunting? how about your movement? Obviously I won't be doing jumping jacks, but are their eyes as good as like a turkey? Anyway, just looking for tips for a beginner. :) Thanks!
 

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I'm headed home from Kansas. When I get home I will give you some ideas. What kind of call do you have?
 

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I’m also very interested in hearing this from @btech29. I’ve got permission on a 1200 acre cattle farm that I know is full of coyotes and I’d like to get into it a little bit. I grew up on the joining property and have shot plenty down there but most were out of the truck/tractor window going to check cows and such.
 

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Ok guys, I am certainly no expert, but I can give some very basic tips that may help. I dont know where everyone is on things, so I will start with what may seem mundane. I guide lots of hunters that have never been, so I will go with what I tell them. I am not very good at putting my thoughts in print, and will wonder all over the place, so bear with me.

Scent control is of no importance. Camo is good, but any dark clothes work. If they get downwind it is over, end of story. They can hear you, and they can even see you, but if they even think they may have smelt you they will run out of your life forever.

When you make it to your stand, get out of the truck and be quiet. Dont slam the truck door as if to tell them, here I am! Try not to bang and clang getting your stuff out of the back. If you are hunting with someone it is fine to talk quietly, but keep the hooping and hollering to a minimum. You can park fairly close to were you are going to sit if you keep things to a dull roar. You dont have to tip toe walking in, but be as quiet as you can without making it a job. Its suppose to be fun.

When you get to were you are going to sit, make sure you can see as much as possible. This can be tricky in the timber and I use one of those fold up dove type chairs to get me up off the ground. I can see better and I will make more stands when my back dont hurt from getting up and down off the ground all day. I will also sit still because I am more comfortable.

A good set of shooting sticks are a must. I use bipods because they are better for faster target acquisition. Ive tried everything, and bipods are by far the best. I know lots of hardcore coyote killers and almost all use bipods, unless they are night hunters. Use whatever you want, but that is my advise.

Take a few minutes to get all the fidgeting out of your system. Play with your scope, turn all the adjustments and do all your fake aiming at this point. Once you get it all where you want it just leave it alone and sit still. Put your scope on a low setting. Nothing worse than calling in a barn burner coyote and your scope is set on 12 power. I always set mine on 4 or 5. You have more time to turn it up than to turn it down when one comes busting in close. If you must use adjustable objective scopes, set it on 100 yards and leave it be. If you have exposed turrets, check to see if its set where it needs to be. You wont have time to fool with these things when a coyote is coming in. If you are buying a scope for coyote hunting, get a 2x10 or 3x9 or the likes. No need to go over 12 power where you have an AO. Absolutely no need for that in coyote hunting. If you hunt very much you will thank me later.

Always try to sit in cover and in the shade when possible. Sometimes you cant help but sit in the sun, but avoid it at all costs. The wind direction does not always allow a shady spot though. Its not a perfect science but you will get to were you know where the coyotes are most likely to come from. Start will your gun set up in that direction. You will get to where you dont have to move the gun much, which is advantageous. They aint real bright, but they do have eyes. Cats especially will catch your movement.

If you are hunting with a buddy and see a coyote coming, for the love of gawd, dont point at it. This is just dumb, just dont do it.

When setting you caller out, the distance depends on the wind for me. If I am cheating a cross wind I will set it further out. I like to keep it far enough out to give me a little cushion on them seeing me and especially smelling me. Typically I will set it 40 or 50 yards out, but sometimes as far as 70 yards if I dont have much cover. This is not super important, so Im not going to spend any time on it. Just keep it away from you. Keep the wind in mind, use common sense. You dont want the wind blowing into where they are going to come from. Pretty basic.

When calling coyotes or cats, I use rabbit sounds. You can kill both the birds sounds too. Rabbits are more pleasing to my ears so that is what I use. I call a lot of cats every year and they are all to rabbit.

I start out with a rabbit and play it for 5 minutes. I will pause for 30 seconds and go right into my second rabbit and so on, for 3 rabbits. Most coyotes are going to come under 5 minutes and most cats under 8. That is not to say I dont kill stuff out past 10 minutes but it is not real common. If you are limited on the amount of spots you have to call, then you might as well sit longer. I have an almost unlimited amount of stands so I go for averages. I will rarely sit for over 15 minutes. After you play rabbit and give the cats and whimpy coyotes a chance then you might as well try a few minutes of aggressive vocals. Fights, pup distress etc. Sometimes I kill more doing this than rabbit. Not going to go into much detail on that.

Howling can be good, but its too much to type and explain. Just start with rabbit and work you way up to that later. Never a bad idea to make a few howls to start your stand in the early morning and late afternoon. I dont mess with it much in the mid day.

Decoys are optional. I personally do not use them. I have had coyotes run up and bite them, but more often than not the flare off when they see them. They are coming to the sound. They dont see a decoy until they are already in range, so why chance it. Again, its averages. Im not against them, just not for me. I can see a slight use for them in cats, but what I have seen is they go into sneak mode when they see one. The slower they come, the more chances for them to see you! I went through the decoy stage, so I wont begrudge anyone for trying them. You will quit if you hunt very long.

I use Foxpro. So the sounds I use are by them. I use Caggie Cottontail, then Mrs Cottontail and finish with Eastern or Adult cottontail. There are lots of good sounds, but that is what I like. Baybee is also very good. Sometimes a change in pitch or cadence is enough to break loose a wary coyote or a distracted cat. Change things up. Nutty Nuthatch is a good bird sound as well as Lucky Bird. Try em all and see what works for you.

The main thing is to stay after them. There are days that you absolutely cant buy a coyote. Those are the days that make you want to quit. Then there are days you cant do nothing wrong. Keep in mind the further east you go the harder the calling is. If I have said it once, I have said it a thousand times. If I had to hunt east of the Mississippi I would quit hunting coyotes. I know you see pics on Facebook of "big killers" out east. Those guys are killing them at night. Apples and Oranges from old school day callers. They couldnt call their way out a wet paper sack in the daytime.
 

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Btech, I appreciate your tips. I am a rookie at predator hunting and the information you share is valued. I just got access to a couple thousand acres of mixed cattle farm and river bottom hardwoods. Going after the snow stops this weekend. Suggestions??
 

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What Rifle or Shotgun do you use? Which ones not to use?
Thank you.... Really Enjoy Coyote hunting...
 

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How loud do you start and how do you progress.
I normally start quiet if I am set up in tight. If I am out in the big open ground I start louder. All I know is Foxpro callers, but I usually play in the 20s out of 40. If the wind is howling or I think the coyotes are far away I will call louder. You don't want to be freakishly loud, but they can't come to what they can't hear. I prolly tend to error on the side of too loud.
 

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Btech, I appreciate your tips. I am a rookie at predator hunting and the information you share is valued. I just got access to a couple thousand acres of mixed cattle farm and river bottom hardwoods. Going after the snow stops this weekend. Suggestions??
That is the best kind of ground. You will have more luck in the cattle ground. The cows will give you fits, so try to avoid then if possible. They will normally stampede around like a bunch of raving idiots which in not helpful. Most coyote know they have sharp hooves and they hurt! I am forced to call around them at times and you just have to make do. I have been using Caggie Cottontail and having good luck. Play it at mid volume. Turn it up loud every now and then for a few seconds to reach out a little further if needed, or stay quite if you want to keep from overlapping your next stand if it's close. I'm not having much luck with vocals right now, but that should change any day now. If they have not been messed with, they should come to rabbit.
 
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What Rifle or Shotgun do you use? Which ones not to use?
Thank you.... Really Enjoy Coyote hunting...
Ain't really any wrong gun, but stay away from rim fire. Shotguns can be good in thick stuff but I prefer a rifle. If you do use a shotgun, number 4 buck is best. I don't know if you can use it in Arkansas now. If not T or BB has been best for me. I have killed some with a good stout turkey load, but heavier is better. I use a 22-250.
 

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Ain't really any wrong gun, but stay away from rim fire. Shotguns can be good in thick stuff but I prefer a rifle. If you do use a shotgun, number 4 buck is best. I don't know if you can use it in Arkansas now. If not T or BB has been best for me. I have killed some with a good stout turkey load, but heavier is better. I use a 22-250.
Thank you..
 

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@btech29 ......aka - Pasture Poodle Eradicator, The Mangy Mutt Murderer or The Prairie Wolf Nightmare..........he’s just about global now.

He’ll call me from time to time for some pointers and I have been able to watch him grow in the sport. I remember his first thermal scope, he had it mounted backwards. There was also that time he stole his wife’s bunny tail off her “ Halloween costume” and used it like a distressed rabbit. We both agreed that wearing Orange wasn’t one of the greatest ideas and shooting out of the truck brings its own problems.......still proud of him
 

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@btech29 ......aka - Pasture Poodle Eradicator, The Mangy Mutt Murderer or The Prairie Wolf Nightmare..........he’s just about global now.

He’ll call me from time to time for some pointers and I have been able to watch him grow in the sport. I remember his first thermal scope, he had it mounted backwards. There was also that time he stole his wife’s bunny tail off her “ Halloween costume” and used it like a distressed rabbit. We both agreed that wearing Orange wasn’t one of the greatest ideas and shooting out of the truck brings its own problems.......still proud of him
Duck...
Water Cloud Sky Plant Water resources
 

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[mention]btech29 [/mention] I appreciate the response to the thread.
How far are you typically moving from your last set, on average?
With coyotes I like to move a ways. 1/2 mile or more. If you call quite you might do a little closer. The terrain can influence that.

Cats, as close as 3 or 400 yards. If I make a close move I might play rabbit on the first stand and then bird on the second incase they may have heard me. Cats won't come as far as a coyote.
 

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Btech I love how I use the phrase “couldn’t call themselves out of a wet paper sack In the daytime” so many people see these guys killing them at night with their high dollar thermal and gadgets and think that predator hunting is easy just go set up and kill some dogs well I’ve been after them hard for the last 6 years the first 2 I never fired a shot at a called animal the next couple years I would kill a few then the last 2 years I really done good considering the ground I have to hunt on most of my stands have to over lap and have to call to the same packs of dogs nearly every hunt!! This year has been really tough on me I’ve hunted hard and have only called in 3 yotes that I got eyes on!!! It’s been a struggle the last couple weeks hopefully it gets better soon I’m just not seeing any activity or hearing any locating at night
 
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