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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will corn you buy for feeders grow and produce enough to plant in a foodplot. The only thing I can think of is it will have to be inoculated. Reason I ask is corn from a co op is round up ready for $150 a bag compared to $8. Am I wishful thinking?
 

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So what's the answer? I know I always grow a handful of stalks around my feeders every year, so it might do decent if you cultivate it right. Shoot, even if you only get 20% that germinate you can buy 4-5 bags and still be way ahead of the game if that's what a bag of good seed costs...
 

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Wes I talked to 2 differnet seed companies and here is what they both said. Feed corn is a mixed bag of nonhybrid corns. It will grow but they said you will have different size and varaties of plants. They also said you will have different maturity dates on the plant. None of this in my case matters. I dont care if the field is the same height and by having different maturity will spread out the amounts so that the deer dont eat it all at once. $150 vs $8 this is a no brainer to me. One last thing is you cant use roundup {we dont} on the feed corn.
 

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You cant use roundup because it will not be roundup ready or pre treated. We dont use it because we dont have that bad of a weed problem.
Correct :thumb:

Roundup (glyphosate) kills plants by blocking an enzyme called EPSP synthase.

Round up ready plants produce a different EPSP synthase, which is not blocked by glyphosate.

That is why round up ready is so more expensive because your paying for a patent pending treatment that can resist one of the most common used herbicides.
 

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Correct :thumb:

Roundup (glyphosate) kills plants by blocking an enzyme called EPSP synthase.

Round up ready plants produce a different EPSP synthase, which is not blocked by glyphosate.

That is why round up ready is so more expensive because your paying for a patent pending treatment that can resist one of the most common used herbicides.
If that roundup ready seed was used to grow the feed corn why would it not pass on this trait?:confused:
 

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If that roundup ready seed was used to grow the feed corn why would it not pass on this trait?:confused:
If it was in deed the harvest result of roundup ready corn it should pass the trait. This is one thing Monsanto has sued people for in the past planting (brown bag corn) without paying their tech fee.
 

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Well Im a little out of date :smack:

I just read where seed companys now have the technology where seeds produce proteins that will not allow their offspring (F2 plants)to grow. It's called "Terminator Technology".

So in this case if Monsanto has applied this protein to their seed it will not grow. There is a lot of corn that is grown that is not round-up ready especially in foreign countries. So you would be taking a big gamble just assuming the corn you bought at the feed store was actually even the offspring of round-corn. However if ya bought directly from a farmer you may know a little more :wink:

All I can say is experiment
 

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I just read where seed companys now have the technology where seeds produce proteins that will not allow their offspring (F2 plants)to grow. It's called "Terminator Technology".
I don't think they have used it yet. They will probably not use it on seed corn because it is hybrid. You cannot save the seed and produce the same corn as last year. To produce the seed the year before, they detassel the corn and pollenate it with the type they want. Milo is a hybrid also. You may still be able to buy straight line genetic field corn, I don't know. Wheat and Soybeans are not hybrids yet, but getting there.


If you look at the website below, the corn is non hybrid

http://www.heirloomseeds.com/corn.htm

which means you can plant the seed year after year and theoretically get the same ears every year. Hope this helps.
 
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