Arkansas Hunting banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Select Member<br>2010-11 Deer Hunting Contest Winn
Joined
·
3,647 Posts
http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/?

Corn Gluten Meal Research Page

Dr. Nick Christians


Welcome to the corn gluten meal research page. Here you will find information regarding the use of corn gluten meal as a natural herbicide for use on turf and organic crop production.

Background
: It was found that a byproduct of the corn (Zea mays L.) wet-milling process, corn gluten meal, has potential as a natural preemergence herbicide. U.S. Patent 5,030,268 on the use of corn gluten meal as a natural



herbicide was issued in 1991. The patent was reissued in 1993 with broader claims that cover the use of corn gluten meal on field crops and home gardens. Two additional patents were also issued in 1993 on the technology. The first is on the use of hydrolyzed proteins from corn and other grains that were shown to have higher levels of herbicidal activity than the corn gluten meal. These materials are water soluble and can be sprayed on the soils surface. The second patent was on 5 dipeptides extracted from the hydrolyzed corn gluten meal. These dipeptides were shown to have the same type of biological activity observed when the corn gluten meal and the hydrolyzed meal are applied to the soil.

The sprayable materials have been found to be less stable than the corn gluten meal in field studies. Current research is being directed at methods of stabilizing these soluble materials to improve their efficacy.
 

·
Select Member<br>2010-11 Deer Hunting Contest Winn
Joined
·
3,647 Posts
And of course, the good old Wiki entry:

Corn gluten meal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Corn gluten meal (often simply called CGM) is a byproduct of corn (maize) processing that has historically been used as an animal feed. In 1985, Dr. Nick Christians of Iowa State University, discovered that CGM displayed pre-emergent herbicidal effects during a series of turf grass experiments.[1] The use of corn gluten meal as an herbicide was patented in 1991,[1] but, like many food-related substances used for gardening, is not regulated in the US.[2]
 

·
Ultimate Member 2007 Team Turkey Contest Winner
Joined
·
56,584 Posts
Very intersting read, Many; thanks....so since you wouldn't ordinarily expect deer to get all of their energy from eating at your feeder....even 50% value would be acceptable for the dry form of feed, since the deer will be getting the rest from forage plants and mast. I'd go for it if I could find it!:up:
 

·
Grand Member
Joined
·
16,536 Posts
There are different protien levels of Corn Glutten. Some run as high as 40% portein, some as low as 10%. You can get it in pellet or meal form. I've got 300 pounds of corn glutten (per ton) in the feed I use.

It's what's left over from when they make corn starch.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top