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Hi, I have always been a gun hunter. got tired of hunting boxes,wanting to get into the close up style. If you have any tips and or advice to help out a true novice it would be greatly appreciated. I helped a friend out and he the payment was a fully loaded pearson spoiler(he now has a matthews bow). his draw length is too long. do i just change strings to adjust the draw?
 

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Someone you know who bowhunts would probably love to help you out. Once you start bowhunting gun hunting will take a major backburner.

You need to adjust the draw length to your specified length and you can get this done at a bow shop. Wrong draw length is a major reason as to why a bunch of people can't get consistent groups.

Welcome to the new elite. Enjoy your stay.
 

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Grand Member<br>2007 Bowhunting Contest Team Winne
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:biggrin:your buddy really stuck it to you.Just kidding.You will most likely love it.Go to archery shop.They will take care of you and get you going on the right track.Them were one of the best bows made at that time.Remember bowhunting is a short game.Learn to shoot from a stand at close ranges out to about 25 yds at first as this will take care of most of your shots.Goodluck
 

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Everyone has said what I thought, go to a bowshop and let them set you up right. There are too many variables that come into play when shooting a bow, so let an expert get you going. They can adjust your drawlength, like FroMan said, that's probably the biggest mistake people make, having the wrong lenght. That leads to poor shooting.

After getting your bow setup....practice....practice...practice.
I'd suggest buying a good target and try to wear it out. Personally, I don't shoot for hours at a time, but I like to go out and shoot for shorter periods, usually focusing on that first shot, it will be the one that counts anyway.
Shoot from the ground, sitting down, on a stool, shoot from a tree.

Good luck.
 

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You've got about a month to get up to speed shooting that bow. Take it to the bow shop, and have them fix you up. Fit is crucial.
Shoot often, but dont shoot too long each time. Your muscles will get tired, and it forms bad habits. With some practice, you should have plenty of time to be shooting well out to 25yds come Oct.
 

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Good advice above, first stop bow shop to get adjusted for your draw length etc. they can get you going in the right direction. Then practice as often as you can. The best way if you can is to get together w/ your friend and shoot for a while it always helps to have others that have some experience work w/ you. Good luck come deer season you will be hooked shortly if not already :biggrin:
 

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well it looks like all the pros gave you some good advice. now i will give you some novice words of encouragment. i just started last year witha ross bow that i bought off ebay last year. i only had 2 weeks to shoot before the season started. i was lucky i guess that shooting a bow was easier for me than shooting a gun. i got a tom with a 10 inch beard and a 7 point my first season both shots at 30 yards so im sure if you feel confident in your shooting that you will do well. also i definitely agree with not wanting to gun hunt as much. i havnet wanted to put my bow down since i got it. i think my wife is jealous. this year i got a new bowtech 82 airborne and it is blazing fast and fun to shoot. good luck this season!
 

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Once you get your bow set up the most important thing you can do is practice (with broadheads) but like a couple of other guys have stated-don't over do it. Shoot awhile and rest because if you start shooting bad your confidence will go down and confidence is very important when you shoot a bow. You'll get frustrated if you shoot too long and then it will just snowball from there. Welcome to the sport! It is a true passion for most people.
 

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thanks for your adivce and comments..whats a good way to make a home made target?:up:
We have made some from old t shirts in burlap bag or feed sack. you might try a coffee shop that cooks their own beans they might have free burlap bags or tater sacks at grocery store. We also have a storm window company that we get screen material scraps from they work great as stuffing.....:up:
 

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Ultimate Member 2007 Team Turkey Contest Winner
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The main reason to practice is twofold....the one is obvious; if you don't, you won't be a very good bowhunter. The other reason is that you can do some things to your mucles and connective bones and tissue that are serious. Take your time, have the bow turned down to a weight that when you draw it your knees don't begin to knock together...oh, say; 40 lbs...shoot that weight for several days to tone your muscles and get the feel of everything. It's correct that you need to go to a bowshop and have the draw length set to your individual size before you do anything else, and have the string/cables checked. Don't put off the practice at lower draw weights though...I knew an olympic instructor that clued me in on this! Good luck!
 

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If you truly get bit by the bug, you may never pick up a gun again. So watch it. Bowhunting to me has become an addiction. One that thank goodness, my wife allows me to enjoy. I haven't deer hunted with my gun in three years, and I have no intention of picking it up this year. In fact, I've thought about selling it. Whether I harvest a deer or not, it does not concern me. Having deer in close and seeing them up close and personal is what it's all about to me. Last year I had a small buck actually rub his back on the tree that I was in with my climbing stand. It was way too cool. I also had several does and other small bucks come within 10-15 yards from my stand last year. I saw them do things that I never saw when I gun hunted. Just little things like yawning, scratching their head with their hind leg and biting at one another.

The most important thing is to keep it simple, enjoy yourself and have a good time. And like several others have mentioned, practice in short bursts. Don't shoot a whole bunch all at one time. We keep a target set up at our campsite, and the rule is that you can't take more than three shots at a time then you have to wait a few minutes before you shot again. I personally like to take one shot and focus on making that shot count and then do something else for a few minutes then take another shot. That's what happens when you hunt. You usually only get one shot.

As uncle ted says "welcome to the brotherhood blood brother."
 
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