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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Uberti .44 cal revolver for sale for $150 or would like to trade for coon hound pup. The gun comes with some powder, lead, caps and measuring tube. Shoots great, I shot a doe with it this year.
 

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You mean you FINISHED a doe off with it this year...right... :wink:

The gun you are advertising is only legal for backup purposes in Arkansas. Just thought I would throw that out there. Fun guns to shoot though, I have one myself.
 

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You mean you FINISHED a doe off with it this year...right... :wink:

The gun you are advertising is only legal for backup purposes in Arkansas. Just thought I would throw that out there. Fun guns to shoot though, I have one myself.
Just so people interested in the gun know. By backup They mean you must carry a regular muzzleloader also. There does not appear to be a restriction on using it.
 

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Just so people interested in the gun know. By backup They mean you must carry a regular muzzleloader also. There does not appear to be a restriction on using it.
Right, but its not legal to "hunt" large game (deer, bear, etc.) with it. In other words, the first shot made at the animal cannot be with it.

But beyond that, its a good looking gun, and the top strap makes it a little more sturdier than those without them. I believe, I might be mistaken, but the "Army" model have round barrels, and the "Navy" models have octagonal barrels.
 

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Just to clarify things...

From the 2011-2012 guide book.

To be used for deer hunting, muzzleloading
rifles must have a barrel 18 inches or longer
and be .40 caliber or larger. Magnifying sights
may be used. The use of shot is not legal. Legal
muzzleloaders use flint, percussion cap, primer
or electronic pulse, are loaded through the
muzzle and are not capable of firing a cartridge.

Hunters may use muzzleloading handguns with
barrels 9 inches or longer that are:

• .45 caliber or larger if they shoot conical
bullets (200 grains or heavier), or

• .530 caliber or larger if they shoot round balls.

A hunter may carry a muzzleloading handgun
of any caliber as backup to a muzzleloading rifle.


I just would not, and doubt the seller would either, want someone to buy this gun under the pretense that you can legally "hunt" with it. But rather, it would be a very fine choice of weapon to take legally with yourself when muzzle loading. I used to carry a small .32 caliber cf pistol with me and then realized it was illegal. But I did not like the idea of hunting in some pretty rugged area's known to hold bear and whatnot, without having a quick "backup" with me. So I got a .44 cal Navy and I like it.
 

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I'm pretty sure is an 1851 navy.
Nope...brass frame 1858 Remington. :wink:

I might be mistaken, but the "Army" model have round barrels, and the "Navy" models have octagonal barrels.
Main difference is the smaller frame of the Navy and the Navy is .36 caliber. There are spin-off's of the 1851 Navy in .44 caliber but that wasn't the original chambering. The 58's all have octagonal barrels, same with the 51's. 1860 Army has a round barrel but the 1861 Navy likewise has too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well.... This truly has been educational! :) like I said in an earlier post, the doe I shot was in Missouri. It's legal to use these guns as a primary in Missouri. It is a challenge though, you have to be in "bow range" to make an ethical shot.
 
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