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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stopped at both the Bass Pro Shop in Memphis and Gander Mountain in North Little Rock. When I asked for black powder, no, not one of the 5-10 substitutes on the shelves but real Goex, Elephant or Swiss brand real black powder…. the salesmen always got wide eyed and told me that… '… well if we have any it's locked up in the back….' OK, I'm in no hurry, go look. No one had it in stock. odd……

why?

Tommy
 

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Black powder is classified as an explosive and has to be kept in a special locker, whereas the BP substitutes and smokeless powder is considered a flammable solid and has more lenient storage requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The substitutes have the same burning characteristics, but are classified differently?

I understand about how smokeless powders are propellants vs. an explosive, but didn't realize that applied to BP substitutes as well.

You'd have thought I asked for something illegal, judging from the expressions.....:head:

Tommy
 

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It's become a real pain to get real black powder. One of the reasons I've been going to the BP shoots in Berryville is that the old man with the truck full of Goex, Schutzen, and Swiss is always there. No frieght, no haz-mat fees. Last year it was 10 bucks a pound, this year 12. The end of this month I'll see him again. :biggrin:

Happiness is nasty old, wonderful smelling, greasy mess-making black powder :biggrin:
 

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Goex has been lobbying of late to get this changed:

http://www.goexpowder.com/

Yep, going to see the powder man is one of the main reasons I go to Berryville. Last year I tried the Schuetzen powder, wasn't bad. This time I'm gonna pick up a couple of pounds of 3f, either Swiss or Goex (I love Swiss powder).

By the way, if you can't make it to Berryville but want real blackpowder, the powder man has a website and he's one of the best to buy powder from anywhere:

http://www.powderinc.com/index.html

No 25 lb. minimum like a lot of other places...

Spot
 

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Wow, I had no idea he has a web site. I thought he just had the truck! :biggrin:

He's a right nice feller to deal with, but that cigarette hanging out of his mouth gives me pause sometimes...:eek:
 

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It's because Black Powder is the most unstable propellant charge there is....almost as bad as pure nitro...very dangerous stuff!:wink:
I'll go along in that any propellant is dangerous, but could you please provide a source for the statements that black powder is the most unstable propellant charge there is, or that it is almost as bad as pure nitro?

Not trying to start an argument here. Black powder is mixed via a mechanical process which can be very dangerous, but I'm not aware that it is unstable or more dangerous than, say, a can of smokeless.

Thanks.
 

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I've always read it has something to do with static electricity. All reloading equipment and storage containers for BP is metal and never plastic. If that's true, why are cow horns so popular for powder flasks? :head:
 

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Actually, Swiss and Schuetzen powders both come in plastic containers these days.

Static electricity is certainly a danger during the mixing process and is why one should never load directly from a flask (it's also why so many flasks are made of brass). But static electricity is also what causes grain elevators to explode - maybe grain is unstable too?:biggrin:
 

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I'm telling you what I learned when I was a youngster in the USN....some of the first watches I ever stood were down in the magazines where I was alone, with thermometers and a sound powered phone. If any powder at all was on the decks in them magazines...it was like the biggest freakout you ever saw. But them magazines were so sterile you could've eat off the floor! We used to play with black powder....we made little hand missiles that would go off solely on impact....a pinch of black powder and a bb wrapped in tin foil ought to do it for ya!:fit::up:
 

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I'm telling you what I learned when I was a youngster in the USN....some of the first watches I ever stood were down in the magazines where I was alone, with thermometers and a sound powered phone. If any powder at all was on the decks in them magazines...it was like the biggest freakout you ever saw. But them magazines were so sterile you could've eat off the floor! We used to play with black powder....we made little hand missiles that would go off solely on impact....a pinch of black powder and a bb wrapped in tin foil ought to do it for ya!:fit::up:
:fit:With that much old powder laying around in steel spaces I can understand why loose powder on the deck would cause so much concern. However (and with all due respect), they were more concerned about a spark being produced and causing an explosion than ignition from compression or inherent instability of the powder itself.

From Encyclopedia Britannica:

"Black powder is relatively insensitive to shock and friction and must be ignited by flame or heat. In the early days such devices as torches, glowing tinder, and heated iron rods were used to ignite the powder and, in most cases, a train of the powder was led to the main charge in order to give the firer time to get to a safe place.

In cannons a small touchhole was drilled into the breech and filled with fine powder. Ignition of the charge was usually by means of a slow-burning punk. The same principle was employed in flintlock muskets and rifles except that ignition resulted from sparks produced by contact between flint and steel.

Percussion methods of firing guns have long been in universal use. In the most common procedure, pulling the trigger releases a hammer, which strikes an impact-sensitive explosive mixture. This explosion then ignites the black powder or other powder charge."

Not trying to be argumentative, I just don't want people to have the wrong ideas about this stuff. It really should be reclassified so it wouldn't be so difficult to get.

:salute::biggrin:

Spot
 

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Not trying to be argumentative, I just don't want people to have the wrong ideas about this stuff. It really should be reclassified so it wouldn't be so difficult to get.

:salute::biggrin:

Spot
Just be sure to stay away from yer ole lady while she's brushing her hair:fit::fit::up:
 

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I have 4 lbs of BP taped to the hinges of my gun safe, and a sign on the front saying not to use a cutting torch to open it. The wife wanted to know what would happen if someone did use a torch, I told her we could rebuild that corner of the house, but my guns wouldn't be stolen.:biggrin:
 

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I have a special sign on my gun rack that says..."Okay...you got in and found my guns...most of them, now come outside and see how far you can get before I blow yer A$$ away!":cool::razz::up:
 

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I have 4 lbs of BP taped to the hinges of my gun safe, and a sign on the front saying not to use a cutting torch to open it. The wife wanted to know what would happen if someone did use a torch, I told her we could rebuild that corner of the house, but my guns wouldn't be stolen.:biggrin:
Sounds....effective!

I may just skip the BP and just post a sign. :biggrin:
 
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