Arkansas Hunting banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,434 Posts
Last two years when the moon has been up in late morning (10:00 give or take) me and my FIL has kill and seen deer throughout the morning up to the point we got off stands (10:30 -11:00) Afternoon not so much but a few.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Like most general questions, the answer is: it depends. The generic response is that the hours around dawn and dusk are usually most productive, and those around midday least productive. In my experience--for deer and predators, at least--morning is probably better than evening, though the difference is only slight, and other hunters with different experiences may disagree. In addition, game that is being pursued by hunters or otherwise disturbed may become active at any time of the day or night.

You also have to understand that game animals--like most people--are creatures of habit. Just because you see lots of tracks along a particular stream bed or trail, doesn't mean you're going to bring something home if you sit there at the wrong time. Scout the area first and find out not just the routes traveled by game, but also when they travel those routes. Some deer trails are morning trails; some are evening trails; others are traveled almost exclusively at night. If I had realized this simple truth sooner, my early hunting career would have been immensely more successful. For those who can afford them, motion activated game cameras that record time and date, make this task much easier.

Once you learn when game will be in your area, get to the stand early (preferably at least two hours before their expected arrival) and wait as silently as possible. My two cents worth is that anyone who comes to a morning stand at 8:30 am is generally wasting his time. Be up in the tree and ready to go before the first ray of sunlight even thinks about hemorrhaging the eastern horizon and you just might score.

One wild card regarding deer is the "rut"--or mating season--which (at least in theory) is supposed to roughly coincide with modern gun season. During this two or three week period, deer often don't follow their previous routines. Occasionally you'll find a buck throwing caution to the wind to mate with as many does as possible--a trait that has put many of their heads on living room walls. On the other hand, deer generally seem to know when firearm season is here and become more cautious, rut or no rut. The big 10 or 12 point trophy bucks didn't get that big by being stupid.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
I haven't seen a deer the last two afternoons, now around 8:30-9:00 I have seen a few but not many. I hope things get better, I have put in a lot of time scouting, scouting some more, hunting what should be good spots and I have a hard time seeing any deer activity. I have been winded by almost every deer lately or had them come running by fleeing other hunters, and the wind seems to be constantly changing. But all it takes is just a few seconds to change a season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,356 Posts
In my opinion the best time to hunt regardless of what the moom phase may be is any time I get the chance to.

I've never killed many while setting around the house. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
875 Posts
Like most general questions, the answer is: it depends. The generic response is that the hours around dawn and dusk are usually most productive, and those around midday least productive. In my experience--for deer and predators, at least--morning is probably better than evening, though the difference is only slight, and other hunters with different experiences may disagree. In addition, game that is being pursued by hunters or otherwise disturbed may become active at any time of the day or night.

You also have to understand that game animals--like most people--are creatures of habit. Just because you see lots of tracks along a particular stream bed or trail, doesn't mean you're going to bring something home if you sit there at the wrong time. Scout the area first and find out not just the routes traveled by game, but also when they travel those routes. Some deer trails are morning trails; some are evening trails; others are traveled almost exclusively at night. If I had realized this simple truth sooner, my early hunting career would have been immensely more successful. For those who can afford them, motion activated game cameras that record time and date, make this task much easier.

Once you learn when game will be in your area, get to the stand early (preferably at least two hours before their expected arrival) and wait as silently as possible. My two cents worth is that anyone who comes to a morning stand at 8:30 am is generally wasting his time. Be up in the tree and ready to go before the first ray of sunlight even thinks about hemorrhaging the eastern horizon and you just might score.

One wild card regarding deer is the "rut"--or mating season--which (at least in theory) is supposed to roughly coincide with modern gun season. During this two or three week period, deer often don't follow their previous routines. Occasionally you'll find a buck throwing caution to the wind to mate with as many does as possible--a trait that has put many of their heads on living room walls. On the other hand, deer generally seem to know when firearm season is here and become more cautious, rut or no rut. The big 10 or 12 point trophy bucks didn't get that big by being stupid.
I Concur VarmitAttorney. I slew my big bodied six point at 07:19 a.m. Saturday. But I prefer the one to five fish scale in those magazines for the best times. :fit:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top