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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wanting to try a muzzle loading BP shotgun this Fall for squirrel.
It's nothing fancy, a CVA single barreled one I got for not much at all.
I have wads, over-shot thin wads and shot.

I'm thinking 1 oz. FF and same volume of shot for first tries on the range.

There's also a 0.69" round ball load in the manual, but I got no balls that big on hand, yet.

Any heads-ups or tips are appreciated.

Tommy
 

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Hey there Tommy,

Welcome to the world of muzzleloading smoothbores! This is some of the most fun you'll ever have muzzleloading, and just wait until you take a squirrel or rabbit with a muzzleloading shotgun - and tell me if you don't find yourself with a big silly grin on your face.

I currently own a 12-gauge T/C New Englander, a .56 caliber (28-gauge) T/C Renegade, and two .62 caliber (20-gauge) flintlocks, one made by TVM and the other a Jackie Brown Carolina smoothbore. I LOVE blackpowder shotguns!

Is your CVA cylinder bore? If so, you might find that using a little more shot by volume than powder will help to tighten your patterns just a bit. Some people swear by buffers such as Cream-of-Wheat. I've tried this a number of times while working up a turkey load, but have never really been able to see any difference. Although I'll admit I think it's cool to put Cream-of-Wheat down my barrel. :biggrin:

I shoot both shot and roundball from my 20-gauges, but when I shoot roundball I still load like when I'm using shot - 80 grains of powder (I like 3f in all but the 12-gauge), over-powder card, 1/2" fiber cushion wad, patched (or sometimes unpatched) .600 roundball, then 2 thin over-shot cards. The cushion wad helps because the ball sinks into it a little, which helps to keep the ball centered as it travels up the bore. That .60 caliber roundball will set a deer on its backside, so I know a .69 ball would too...

Is your gun 12-gauge? If so, be sure to use a thick patch if you go with the .69 ball, because (as you probably know) 12-gauge is .75 caliber. I'd try denim, old jeans or something.

Here are a couple of links from an old gentleman in Kentucky who knows a lot about this stuff:

http://home.insightbb.com/~bspen/shotgun.html

http://home.insightbb.com/~bspen/SmoothboreLoads.html

Good luck with this, have fun and let us know how you do. I may be able to help if you have questions...or I may have a few of my own.:wink:

Spot
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for that info. and them links. I'll look-see at them this weekend.
Yep, it's a 12 ga. I think that CVA calls for a .69" ball is because of the choke. That choke may 'go' though.... we'll see.

Thanks again!
Tommy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i have wanted one for many many years. but a bunch more than i can afford. haven't seen one yet less than $500.00 i can buy a bennelli (sp) for that.
This one is a plain-jane CVA single barrel one. I think I paid $75 for it, shipped, new(or just like new)-in-box. :cool:
The double barreled ones are much more expensive.

Tommy
 

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One of our local sports shop owners has allegedly built himself a flintlock double-barreled fowling peice for duck hunting...I've been trying to track him down to have a look-see at it, but our schedules don't mesh very well.

I've wondered how such a shotgun would work in a duck blind. Given that there is a nasty blast of hot gas from the touch-hole when you fire a flintlock, you'd normally put the flint shooter on the right side of the blind...If he's blasting from vents in both directions, where do you put him? :biggrin:
 

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I bet it does!... I just wondered where the vent hole shot out towards on the left hand side barrel.

Tommy
I think that the left vent is far enough forward to clear your nose, but your left eyeball may be at a sufficient angle to get a load of gas...Just saying, I've screwed up and been lined up with other shooter's vent holes when they fired, and it only takes a couple times to get the message! Anybody standing either left or right of you in is peril with the double gun for sure.

Spot, that was a great read, thanks for posting that up!
 

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"...Just saying, I've screwed up and been lined up with other shooter's vent holes when they fired, and it only takes a couple times to get the message..."
Yep, my very moniker is the result of an unfortunate misunderstanding with regard to the proper placement of one's left hand relative to one's touch hole when shooting one's first flintlock from a bench. Ah had her a'layin' across't a sandbag own a shootin' bench an', not havin' anyplace ta put ma left hand, ah sorta hung it thar, just to the right'a ma touch hole.

Bad move, trust me on that. :down: Just nearly messed my britches.

I hope Mr. Hagen will share some of his wisdom, I'm absolutely sure he has forgotten more about muzzleloading in general and flintlocks in particular, than most of us (especially me) will ever know. I mean, jeez - 48 years with a flintlock. 48 years! :clap:

Spot
 

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I've never owned one, but I dove hunted for a couple years with a guy that shot one. It was a hoot to sit on the other side of the field from him and watch him get off one shot every couple minutes. You'd see a puff of smoke and then hear a tremendous BOOM. That dude could sure kill the doves, too! I guess knowing you've only got one shot helps you make that shot count.
 

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I have been using a single barrel 16 for small gamel for a long time. I shoot 1oz of shot with 70gr of ff, my over power wad is waxed carbord about i/4" in thickness my over shot wad is wax carbord same thickness. In this gun all works well hunting small game. For trap/bird hunting things change. I tend to stay with a #6 shot. In any case my major change is the power load, for birds it will increase from 70 to 80,90 or with a lot of wind 100gr. The barrel length of this gun is long enough so the larger load does ignight befor leaving the barrel, any load over 100gr. is causing the extra powder to burn after it leaves the barrel or just scatters around.
 

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Hi there Mr. Hagen,

If you will indulge some questions, do you punch your own cards? Also, would you mind telling more about that gun? Sounds interesting.

I agree with you on loads above 100 grains not burning in the bore too - if I may ask, is that a turkey load, or for waterfowl? I have used as much as 100 grains for a turkey load, but not being much of a duck hunter I never thought much about what kind of load I would use if I ever went.

Squirrel season opens tomorrow!!!! Fer me that means 70 grains in the Carolina Smoothbore with 80 or so grains (volume equivalent) #4 shot. I'm pretty excited...
:biggrin:
Spot
 

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I forgot to tell about the gun.
The barrrel is 36: oct to round, Uses #11 cap I purchased the barrel from Turner Kerkland in 1968, the stock I made using a poor piece of Cherry and put a Hawkin style patch box on it, the ramrod is a 3/16 SS rod with a button cap and threaded for a worm/ball puller. I put a wax cast butt plate on it. The gun is crude but works great, It do raises eye brows when it is used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I forgot to tell about the gun.
The barrrel is 36: oct to round, Uses #11 cap I purchased the barrel from Turner Kerkland in 1968, the stock I made using a poor piece of Cherry and put a Hawkin style patch box on it, the ramrod is a 3/16 SS rod with a button cap and threaded for a worm/ball puller. I put a wax cast butt plate on it. The gun is crude but works great, It do raises eye brows when it is used.
That sounds good to me!

We need pictures!

Tommy
 
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