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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Checked camera yesterday. In a weeks time just one buck managed to get in front of the camera. 2 Weeks ago we had a bunch of pics. I guess the deer dont have to roam around muck for food anymore. I guess it will be all luck and a little skill this year. Not going to get depressed yet will see what opening morning brings. Good luck to all.
 

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I guess it will be all luck and a little skill this year.
I'd rather be lucky than good any day.
That said, just because they're not hitting a corn pile right now doesnt mean you cant kill them. Up here where I hunt there's acorns like this damn near every year. You can kill them with acorns blanketing the ground, and it aint all luck either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'd rather be lucky than good any day.
That said, just because they're not hitting a corn pile right now doesnt mean you cant kill them. Up here where I hunt there's acorns like this damn near every year. You can kill them with acorns blanketing the ground, and it aint all luck either.
I usually have pretty good luck. But its usually with corn feeders or something of that nature. Unfortunatly i have alot more luck than skill when it comes to hunting deer. But i still enjoy every minute of it.
 

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I usually have pretty good luck. But its usually with corn feeders or something of that nature. Unfortunatly i have alot more luck than skill when it comes to hunting deer. But i still enjoy every minute of it.
I've never really thought corn was worth the effort. Most all of my buddies who have private land bait like crazy, but none of them kill more deer than the people I know who save their time and $ by skipping the corn and focusing on the basics (ie: scouting, hunting the wind right, not overhunting 1 or 2 stands, getting in and out of the stand without alerting deer, etc).

That said, I have no problem with baiting. I've hunted over it a lot when I go to my buddies' properties.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've never really thought corn was worth the effort. Most all of my buddies who have private land bait like crazy, but none of them kill more deer than the people I know who save their time and $ by skipping the corn and focusing on the basics (ie: scouting, hunting the wind right, not overhunting 1 or 2 stands, getting in and out of the stand without alerting deer, etc).

That said, I have no problem with baiting. I've hunted over it a lot when I go to my buddies' properties.
I hunt only 1 stand all year long. Thats probably why i dont see any deer much after october. But i enjoy bow hunting alot more than gun hunting. I will say that all of the big bucks that i have killed i have been walking around find a place to sit for a while then bam i get lucky. Right place at the right time.
 

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Here is a little something to think about with all the acorns this year.......

It's no surprise that in autumn, deer frequent corn fields, rolling green meadows of alfalfa, old abandoned orchards and the occasional neighbors garden. Every few years, however, some deer hunters complain about the Game Commission, the neighbor shooting too many does, or that it "must of been a hard winter" cause they just ain't seeing any deer. Well the reason could be just beneath your toes!

Leonard Lee Rue III in his excellent book The Deer of North America remarked that he gauged the acorn crop with his size 11 boots. If he put his foot down and covered nine acorns, it was a good crop. If he put his foot down and covered a dozen - it was an excellent crop. Well I tried that here in the Northeastern section of Connecticut and counted 10 acorns on average. And since the acorns are still dropping like mad, I guess its safe to say that we're having an excellent crop this season and that Len was probably not too far off with his measurement.

So what makes them so special?
The Acorn is THE preferred deer food in the Eastern US. Where Oak trees are abundant, and acorns crops are heavy, the deer will be there. Given a choice between traveling great distances between bedding/security cover and feeding areas, or simply hanging out in a secure area with all the food you could eat, there's little reason for the deer to put themselves in potential danger by going elsewhere for food that is not quite as tasty, full of fats and starch, and so easily obtainable. In years of heavy acorn crops, deer may never even venture into that apple orchard - opting to hang tight on ridge tops and deep within deciduous forests feeding on acorns.

The acorn is low in protein content, but very high in fats and carbohydrates. They are easily digestible, their nutrients are readily absorbed, and they are processed and passed through the body quickly. Because these little nuts are so easily digestible, deer eat lots of them per day, which also gets them the protein content they need to be healthy. On a bumper year, deer can gain a lot of weight in just two weeks, while fawns and yearlings gain muscle, mass and bone while foraging on acorns. By late October, the deer has a thick slab of fat underneath the coat, and along the inside of the paunch.

Not all acorns are created equal
Just as acorns are the preferred deer food in autumn, white oak are the preferred acorns. Deer judge acorn taste, and subsequent preference by the level of tannic acid in the nut. White Oak acorns have the least tannic acid and the large rock oak the highest content. Below is the preference list for acorns, and their associated pictures for identification. Look for the nuts, not the leaves to identify hot places to put your stand. Leaves will not tell you if the tree is producing - only that it is there. Find the nuts, and you find the deer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a little something to think about with all the acorns this year.......

It's no surprise that in autumn, deer frequent corn fields, rolling green meadows of alfalfa, old abandoned orchards and the occasional neighbors garden. Every few years, however, some deer hunters complain about the Game Commission, the neighbor shooting too many does, or that it "must of been a hard winter" cause they just ain't seeing any deer. Well the reason could be just beneath your toes!

Leonard Lee Rue III in his excellent book The Deer of North America remarked that he gauged the acorn crop with his size 11 boots. If he put his foot down and covered nine acorns, it was a good crop. If he put his foot down and covered a dozen - it was an excellent crop. Well I tried that here in the Northeastern section of Connecticut and counted 10 acorns on average. And since the acorns are still dropping like mad, I guess its safe to say that we're having an excellent crop this season and that Len was probably not too far off with his measurement.

So what makes them so special?
The Acorn is THE preferred deer food in the Eastern US. Where Oak trees are abundant, and acorns crops are heavy, the deer will be there. Given a choice between traveling great distances between bedding/security cover and feeding areas, or simply hanging out in a secure area with all the food you could eat, there's little reason for the deer to put themselves in potential danger by going elsewhere for food that is not quite as tasty, full of fats and starch, and so easily obtainable. In years of heavy acorn crops, deer may never even venture into that apple orchard - opting to hang tight on ridge tops and deep within deciduous forests feeding on acorns.

The acorn is low in protein content, but very high in fats and carbohydrates. They are easily digestible, their nutrients are readily absorbed, and they are processed and passed through the body quickly. Because these little nuts are so easily digestible, deer eat lots of them per day, which also gets them the protein content they need to be healthy. On a bumper year, deer can gain a lot of weight in just two weeks, while fawns and yearlings gain muscle, mass and bone while foraging on acorns. By late October, the deer has a thick slab of fat underneath the coat, and along the inside of the paunch.

Not all acorns are created equal
Just as acorns are the preferred deer food in autumn, white oak are the preferred acorns. Deer judge acorn taste, and subsequent preference by the level of tannic acid in the nut. White Oak acorns have the least tannic acid and the large rock oak the highest content. Below is the preference list for acorns, and their associated pictures for identification. Look for the nuts, not the leaves to identify hot places to put your stand. Leaves will not tell you if the tree is producing - only that it is there. Find the nuts, and you find the deer.
Where did you come up with this at? I know you didnt think of this.
 

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At my house the post oak acorns are falling like crazy for the last 2 weeks, but at my stand the red oaks are hardly even visible if any on the trees. Kinda weird this year, seems like they are falling in different times this year and im talking just within a mile or so from each other.
 

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At my house the post oak acorns are falling like crazy for the last 2 weeks, but at my stand the red oaks are hardly even visible if any on the trees. Kinda weird this year, seems like they are falling in different times this year and im talking just within a mile or so from each other.
I'm hearing you man! Last year where I hunted a white oak flat there were deer and acorns like crazy. Everybody's been talking about how many acorns there are this year and there aren't any in that same flat this year. I can't figure it out! :head:
 

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We have white oaks ALL OVER our property. And I don't mean "We have a lot of white oaks" I mean "Yeah, look close, there IS a house in the middle of all those white oaks."

The majority of the pictures I am getting from my cam are of the deer walking by and around the corn feeder to eat the acorns. Last year the ground stayed slick of corn cause they ate it all as soon as it fell. Now there is easily 2 or 3 days worth of corn on the ground. Plenty of munched up acorns though.
 
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