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Suspended Indefinitely
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I am wanting to start fishing for Trout with a fly rod and wondered what kind to get. I have borrowed one a few times, but they have all been a piece of crap and I need to buy one. Bass Pro has some on sale right now for 69 and some for 199 I think. I don't know much about it, so any advice would be helpful. Thank you.
 

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Fly Rod

You can't go wrong with a "Sage" . They have a "Launch" for about $199. One that I like really well is the VT2 in a 5 wt. A Sage reel 1850 series is a great match up. Tariff is a little high but well worth it. Lifetime warranty. Check out eBay for some good buys on a custom rod. A Sage VT2 will weigh about 3.5 oz. Blue Ribbon Fly Shop in Mountain Home can give some excellent advice and have some excellent starter sets for around $200.
 

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I would highly suggest going on a flyfishing class before you buy any equipment. You will be able to try several different rods of various weights and flex. This will help you out when buying a new rod, and if the instructor is very good, you will learn a ton about fly fishing which most people take 5 to 10 years to learn. Where do you plan on fishing? If you fish Beaver Lake tailwaters I would recommend Bill Tenison with White River Angler. His shop is closed right now but is supposed to reopen in the next month. If I remember correctly the class was $200 for two people, and all the equipment and lunch was included.
 

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Select Member<br>2010-11 Deer Hunting Contest Winn
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Don't try to be cheap. The cheap fiberglass rods can be frustrating and will make learning much more difficult.

On the other hand, you don't have to spend several hundred dollars for a good starter rod.

If you are 100% sure you are going to use it exclusively for trout fishing, then go lighter - I would reccomend a 4 weight. That will do pretty much anything you want it to for trout. The length - the longer, the more effectively you can make longer casts, but it also then is more awkward from a casting point of view...

On the other hand - if there is a chance you might want to try it for bream or even bass - then a 5wt. or 6 wt. would not be out of the question.

And be careful - you pick up an Orvis or other REALLY top-notch fly rod and you will be spoiled (and very broke).
 

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I started with a Cortland package around $70. Now I use a Cabelas rod that cost about the same. I would stick with graphite, but dont think you should have to spend more than $100 to get started if you dont want to. I like a 5 or 6 wt, especially since I keep thinking I'm gonna take mine after smallies or white bass one of these days. 8.5ft rod does me pretty well. The tailwaters here are pretty big water, so I dont see any sense in anything shorter.
Also, remember that the reel doesnt do anything but hold line, that's the place to cut $ if you want.
 

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I have used them and own them in all ranges. I now fish a RL Winston 5 weight. Which in my opinion is the best weight for anything in Arkansas. You might check on ebay and look for a Sage DS2 series in 5 or 6 weight. You would not be disappointed in that rod. I own 3 of them. THey are extremely tough and durable rods. They are slower casting rods for a Sage but so is the launch previously spoke of. Really depends on your casting style but just starting out a slower more forgiving rod will be easier for you to use and a Sage DS2 series are great starter rods.
 

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i bought a cabelas 5wt kit for around $100 on sale. it comes with everything including a travel case. i have caught several hundred trout on it so far and it has worked really well.:biggrin:
 

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My advice is to go with a 5 weight with a fairly soft action. I do not recommend buying a cheap rod as there is world of difference in the performance of a cheap Wal-Mart rod and a good Sage, or G Loomis, or Winston, or St. Croix etc. On the other hand, one doesn't have to buy a top-of-the-line rod in order to get good performance either. I suggest you buy an entry-level rod from a major manufacturer, like those I've mentioned. That will set you back about $200. As has already been mentioned, spend your money on the rod and not on the reel. A fly reel for most freshwater fishing is nothing more than a device for holding line. I also highly recommend you get some instruction from someone who really knows what he/she is doing. Fly casting isn't complicated or difficult, but unless you know and practice the basic casting techniques, you will be continuously frustrated. Good luck, it's a wonderful sport.
 
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