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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have Yogoslavian Mauser rifle in 8MM. If I keep it I am planning to sporterize it. Can someone give me some advice on who could do that for me at a reasonable price. I would like a walnut stock, shortened barrel, bent bolt and scope mounts.
Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you wanting it done locally, or do you mind shipping it off for the work to be done?
I would rather have it done localy but would ship it if I have to. I may not even have it done. I may just sell the rifle and put that money toward a new gun. I don't have to decide right away because I will have to check into pricing and save the money to do it. I am just checking it out right now. One big concern is the fact that I shoot left handed and this is a right handed rifle and I don't know that I want to spend that much money on it. I have never even shot the rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah Hudge, I have been kinda thinking along those lines. I don't know what kind of price that I could get for it. I'll look into doing that. I may sell it and put the money toward a NEF Handi-rifle.
 

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I finished a "sporterized" Mauser project a few months ago, I had been working on for a little over a year. I took a K Kale, Turkish mauser (8mm, Large ring action, small ring barrel) that I picked up for $40.00. I rebarreled it with a takeoff Rem 700 barrel in .270 Win, bent & polished bolt, Drilled and tapped for scope mount, low swing safety, Timney sportsman trigger, Fajen composite stock, and topped it off with a Nikon Prostaff 3-9x40.

I removed the original 8mm barrel, as I have a barrel vise, just had to get the correct shim for the vise. I couldn't find anyone local to me (N Little Rock) that wanted to bother with doing the action work, so I did a little searching and found Mark Skaggs: http://www.skaggsgunsmithing.com/. He's located in Oregon, and specializes in building Mauser based rifles. He rebarreled, drilled and tapped, bent and polished the bolt, installed the low swing safety, headspaced, and test fired. He is very reasonable for the work he does, and very thorough. I finished the rifle myself, to keep the cost down, and I have a little under $500 complete.

The Yugo mauser action is an intermediate action, I believe, and I have seen some nice rifles built on Yugo M48, and 24/47 actions.

If you decide to do a "Mauser build" get in touch with me, I've still got my barrel vise, and mauser action wrench, and you are welcome to use them to remove your old barrel. Just keep in mind, it will still be cheaper to go buy a new bolt action rifle off the shelf. But, it's pretty cool when you finish a custom rifle that you've built, and if you can chamber it in any caliber you wish, except some of the larger magnum calibers of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I thought that the guy that I got it from said that it was a Yugo rifle but I found that it is a Turkish Mauser. I bought the rifle from a friend that needed money more than he needed a Mauser.
 

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Turk mausers are even better for building on, as most of them are WW2 vintage K Kale built large ring actions (98 Mauser) that accept small ring barrels. But, the Turks also rearsenaled a lot of small ring (96 Mauser) that they received from Germany during WW1, and used them as well. Here's a pretty good site that will help you identify the rifle: http://www.turkmauser.com/. If you don't have a lot in it, and it's in pretty good shape, (matching numbers, decent stock, very little rust, no missing parts) you might just want to set it back in the closet, and let it collect dust. It will appreciate in value over the next few years, as the supply of Turkish Mausers has pretty much dried up as far as Mil-Surp collectors are concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is stamped with a manufacture year of 1943. Unfortunately, the numbers do not match. I have an offer on the table for a trade that I am considering.
 
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