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K-Mo, I probably read the same articles about the Creedmoor development, i.e. how it was developed for match shooting. I started with the 140 Grain Nosler BT due to those articles, but honestly I wasn't impressed. I decided it wasn't generating enough velocity with the larger bullets to hit hard at 150-200 yards, and I had two lost, well hit bucks to show for it. It may do great in a match...outdo the 308, accurate out to a mile, etc. etc. etc. As you and R6mm both said...there's a big difference between match shooting and hunting in many ways.

If I had a 6.5 CM, I would give the 120 grains a serious look, and if you can find the magic fairy dust RL16, you will like the combo. Or, factory loaded ammo in the 120's is more and more common, and for good reason. That rifle/load combo has accounted for 10 really dead deer, unfortunately creating some dog food out of the front end in the process.
The 6.5 was based off the 30TC, and is nothing more than a 260 Rem with the shoulder pushed back. Why? For one reason only. To shoot higher BC bullets and still fit in a short action. You are correct that it doesn’t carry enough velocity to be used for hunting at long range. So why would it need long high BC bullets? For punching paper. Yes, I think the 120’s make a great round for medium range CXP2 game. Along with a ton of other ones. I personally think a 7-08 is a more ideal hunting round than the 6.5’s. My whole point tho, is that it was designed to allow the capability to shoot heavy for caliber bullets. That is its express and intended purpose and the ONLY thing that sets it slightly apart from a very crowded field. Without using those high BC bullets, it’s literally no different than 1/2 dozen others. 6.5CM’s with 120’s is like Mustangs with V6’s. That’s all I was saying.
 

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I personally think a 7-08 is a more ideal hunting round than the 6.5’s.
I agree, and would add 308 and a whole bunch of others to the list. But there's a whole bunch of 6.5 CM's out there and from the testimonies on here, at least some have shared my frustration with well-hit game getting away. But the hype about the round being deadly at extended range and using those heavy, relatively slow moving bullets was the culprit, IMO. Crank it up to around 3000 fps with a 120 grain bullet and you've got a low-recoil killer. BTW, my son took another kid hunting today, another deer DRT at 125 yards....so the rifle/load combo has now put down 11.
 

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My 300 Weatherby doesn't make that much mess of a deer I shoot harder 180 gn bullets in it. It broke my scope last week so I have been using a 30-06 this week and have shot 2 deer with 165 gn Speer Boat tails. It bruises the deer up worse than the weatherby does. They both kill well.
I know a kid that bought a 6.5 Creed to deer hunt with this year and he has dropped 4 deer this year with it. His is working well for him.
 

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No, the Creedmoor was designed specifically to shoot very high BC bullets out of a short action. A 260 Rem shoots the exact same bullets along with about a half dozen other cartridges. But again, thats purely academic. 6.5 Creedmoor, academically, weren’t designed for deer hunting. They were designed to punch holes in paper a long ways away.
Initially, the .308 that NATO designated as their official cartridge, was not originally designed for deer hunting either, it was going to be a military round. It's a great deer hunting round, & long range, silhouette, & benchrest shooter. Just like the .223 Remington, was not originally designed for hunting, it was a military round. Today, those 2 rounds are very popular as hunting cartridges. Who cares what they were designed for. When you use different type & weight bullets in each of them, they can be used very well for multiple hunting purposes. If it works, don't knock it.
 

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In the combat/close quarters battle role, the .223 is king. There is no denying it. When the M16 replaced the M14 as our nation’s primary service weapon in the 1960s, it permanently made the .308 a less acceptable combat round. The .223 round is lighter, meaning you can carry more of it.
More importantly, though, the recoil is more manageable, an important factor in combat. Select-fire M14s were notoriously difficult to control on full auto, whereas the M16 firing the .223 is much better. There are other factors at play here, such as weapon design, but that doesn’t change the fact that the bigger bullet kicks more.
In combat, he who puts the most rounds into his opponent generally wins. Recoil has an adverse effect on this. There are other specialty rounds like the .300 Blackout and .458 SOCOM that are recent developments that are also great CQB rounds. Their large caliber results in significant tissue damage and they marry up well with the AR platform.
But where all of these rounds fail in comparison to the .308 is range.
The .300 Blackout and .458 SOCOM aren’t designed for long distance, but a .223 round with a high velocity should be able to reach out and touch. It doesn’t, not when compared to the .308.
A .223 coming from a long-barreled M16 is good out to around 600 yards, less with a short-barreled M4. A .308 round is effective out to about 1,000 yards. Big difference.
Another shortcoming of the .223 when used with an AR platform is how finicky it is with regard to twist rates and barrel lengths. Since the round is small it needs to tumble or break apart on impact with a target to do a lot of damage. When a .223 round is fired through the wrong barrel length/twist combo, it “icepicks” targets, going straight through and leaving a minimal wound cavity.
A .308 round is a significantly bigger round. Bullets are measured in grain weights. An average .223 round weighs around 55 grains, but a .308 is about 160 grains, almost three times as heavy. That results in harder hits down range that are less susceptible to barrel length and twist issues. The .308 is less affected by wind than its lighter cousin.
This also makes it a good dual-purpose round for CQB, as well as sniping.
The .308 round works well in an AR platform. For every major .223 tactical rifle made, there is a .308 caliber variant. SCAR, HK and Galil all have .223 variants as well as a big brother .308. Still not the greatest on full auto but significantly better than firing it from the M14.

Sent from my U705AA using Arkansas Hunting mobile app
 

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The 6.5CM’s claim to fame is that it has one of the best marketing campaigns ever. I see folks on the range weekly that can quote ballistics out to 1200 yards even though they’ve never shot past 200 yards.

It’s a good round, but there’s a hundred other good rounds just like it that’ll kill a deer farther than most shooters should be shooting. Any round shooting a 100 grain or heavier bullet at above 2500 fps will reliably kill deer way past 300 yards.
 

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He cut away some of the blood shot rib meat, but the massive trauma is easily seen. If anybody isn’t just biased against it and wants better performance in a 6.5 CM, I heartily recommend that 123 grain sst over RL 16. Great velocity, temp stable, and copper fowling remover. This is deer #10 with this load out to 250 yards. Most DRT.
I just don’t know how we even managed to kill deer before the 6.5 Needmore came along.

We should all trade in our 257 Weatherby’s, 308’s, 270’s & 30’06 rifles. They are obsolete!
 

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The 6.5 Creedmoor loads have 8-11″ less bullet drop at 500 yards and retain approximately 20-50% more energy down range than the 6.5 Grendel load. Indeed, the 143gr 6.5 Creedmoor load has more energy at 200 yards than the 6.5 Grendel has at the muzzle.Aug 8, 2021

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Was the date at the end your attempt to cite a source ordid you accidently copy and paste that too? 😂
 
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