Arkansas Hunting banner
1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a Remington 700 from a forum member, put a Timney and a new scope on it, and tuned in a load. RL16 powder, 123 grain hornady sst. It shoots cloverleafs all day long. My son took it to take a kid hunting this morning. 100 yards it turned the deer a flip, DRT. Took out both shoulders, grazed the spine, and exited.

Jaw Liquid Fluid Ingredient Tire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
He cut away some of the blood shot rib meat, but the massive trauma is easily seen. If anybody isn’t just biased against it and wants better performance in a 6.5 CM, I heartily recommend that 123 grain sst over RL 16. Great velocity, temp stable, and copper fowling remover. This is deer #10 with this load out to 250 yards. Most DRT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,612 Posts
Has absolutely nothing to do with a creedmore but I will not shoot an SST an anything nor any other bullet with a plastic tip unless it is a Barnes TTSX.
I like a good standard cup and core if I'm not shooting coppers.

Congrats to the hunters though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Has absolutely nothing to do with a creedmore but I will not shoot an SST an anything nor any other bullet with a plastic tip unless it is a Barnes TTSX.
I like a good standard cup and core if I'm not shooting coppers.

Congrats to the hunters though.
This exactly. I shot a buck with the same bullet from a 260 Rem, and looked just like that. Absolute mess. Shot a buck with a 100TTSX and it was a clean small wound channel completely though about 3ft of deer, impacting bone most of the way, just like every other copper bullet I’ve shot. The SST definitely delivers all its energy in the form of damage to the animal, but it may be a little more than I need. Although I will say marginal shots that don’t impact bone with a copper isn’t a traumatic wound and can lead to delayed kills and long tracks with small blood trails. I’m leaning towards very fast bonded core bullets for the ideal killing pattern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
I got a Remington 700 from a forum member, put a Timney and a new scope on it, and tuned in a load. RL16 powder, 123 grain hornady sst. It shoots cloverleafs all day long. My son took it to take a kid hunting this morning. 100 yards it turned the deer a flip, DRT. Took out both shoulders, grazed the spine, and exited.

View attachment 379194
Sounds and looks like you built one heck of a fine tuned killing machine! Nice work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I went with the SST because I knew from past history what it was capable of, and I used some tougher bullets with the 6.5 CM and got small exits and long trailing jobs -- not what an Arkansas hunter wants crawling around through thickets in the dark. I don't like the amount of meat loss because I do eat 'em, but its better than losing a whole deer to them running a quarter with a drop of blood every 10 feet or so and then stopping altogether....or no blood at all.

Buckhorn, I use the 130 grain Barnes TTSX in my 308. Super accuracy, and the deer I've shot with them have not run out of sight of the impact zone. I believe Barnes does better with the lighter weight bullets for caliber, but that's just an opinion. I use the 165's in my 300 winmag, but I'm going to try the 150's in it, and if they shoot as good or almost as good as the 165's, I'm going to try them out. A deer won't stop a Barnes I'm thinking....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This exactly. I shot a buck with the same bullet from a 260 Rem, and looked just like that. Absolute mess.
I put this up just to add a little fuel to the 6.5 CM discussions/controversies. A quick look at this pic should serve to show it is an effective killer of deer with a good load and good shot placement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,612 Posts
I went with the SST because I knew from past history what it was capable of, and I used some tougher bullets with the 6.5 CM and got small exits and long trailing jobs -- not what an Arkansas hunter wants crawling around through thickets in the dark. I don't like the amount of meat loss because I do eat 'em, but its better than losing a whole deer to them running a quarter with a drop of blood every 10 feet or so and then stopping altogether....or no blood at all.

Buckhorn, I use the 130 grain Barnes TTSX in my 308. Super accuracy, and the deer I've shot with them have not run out of sight of the impact zone. I believe Barnes does better with the lighter weight bullets for caliber, but that's just an opinion. I use the 165's in my 300 winmag, but I'm going to try the 150's in it, and if they shoot as good or almost as good as the 165's, I'm going to try them out. A deer won't stop a Barnes I'm thinking....
I agree. I use the 120 grain in one of my 7mm-0's. I use 130-150 grain lead cup and core that I reload in my other 7mm-08's. The Barnes shoots so well I just shoot factory in that rifle though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
He cut away some of the blood shot rib meat, but the massive trauma is easily seen. If anybody isn’t just biased against it and wants better performance in a 6.5 CM, I heartily recommend that 123 grain sst over RL 16. Great velocity, temp stable, and copper fowling remover. This is deer #10 with this load out to 250 yards. Most DRT.
Agree with you about the 120-123gr weight bullets in the 6.5 Creedmoor. I don't have one, but I helped a friend work up some loads for his 6.5 Creed. It shot the 120 gr Sierra Spitzer's great.... very accurate, & has worked excellent on deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Agree with you about the 120-123gr weight bullets in the 6.5 Creedmoor. I don't have one, but I helped a friend work up some loads for his 6.5 Creed. It shot the 120 gr Sierra Spitzer's great.... very accurate, & has worked excellent on deer.
Academically speaking, anything less than a 140gr in a Creedmoor is defeating the entire purpose of the round.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
Academically speaking, anything less than a 140gr in a Creedmoor is defeating the entire purpose of the round.
Academically.....you just failed with that BS. The purpose of a 6.5 Creedmoor that's used for deer hunting......is to kill deer. The 120gr bullet does that very well....according to some of my friends & reloaders, & a couple of posters here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
Has absolutely nothing to do with a creedmore but I will not shoot an SST an anything nor any other bullet with a plastic tip unless it is a Barnes TTSX.
I like a good standard cup and core if I'm not shooting coppers.

Congrats to the hunters though.
Yeah, buckhorn I agree wholeheartedly the reason I stopped using the Ballistic Tip bullets is they basically explode inside the deer very rarely exiting. Occasionally a piece of the bullet might exit. This is good as far as shock is concerned, however, if the deer don't fall right there you have only one small hole to leave a blood trail from. The other reason is when they explode most of the time the shrapnel finds its way to the guts and creates a mess basically turning a lung shot deer into a gut shot deer. Not looking for an argument from anyone this is simply my experience after shooting probably 15 or more deer with ballistic tips of several brands. The TTSX being the exception since behind the tip is a solid copper projectile that will hold together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yeah, buckhorn I agree wholeheartedly the reason I stopped using the Ballistic Tip bullets is they basically explode inside the deer very rarely exiting.
Hey Bowhuntr....just as a reminder, the SST bullet my son's young hunter shot exited, which is fairly common with my experience with the 6.5 CM. The Ballistic Tip bullets, as far as I know, were patented and pioneered by Nosler. They indeed had a well-deserved reputation in the early years for blowing up and not penetrating well, especially at close ranges. Strangely, as they worked on them to make them tougher, I also heard stories of them "zipping through" animals with no expansion at medium to longer ranges. That's the tough part of bullet design. Their Accubond solved that dillemma as well as any bullet I've ever shot, but they seem to have struck a good balance with their BT bullets also these days. But as many have observed, you will throw away more shoulders than you will eat with any of them, and the Hornady SST is no different (or their ELDX.)

I've seen the SST blow apart and not exit at 270 velocities, even in the 140 grain....made an awful mess in a 150 pound sow I shot once at around 100 yards. But I've loaded them for a friend in a 300 Win Mag at the lower end of the velocity range and he's had great results.

Bottom line: if you shoot a non-bonded plastic tipped bullet at around 3000 fps it is going to do massive trauma to whatever it hits out to 150 yards or so. After that, it still provides excellent wounding. I shoot gallon water jugs at 500. Shoot one with a Barnes bullet and they just drain the water out, maybe tip over if you are lucky. Shoot a plastic tipped bullet and they still blow the jug up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Academically.....you just failed with that BS. The purpose of a 6.5 Creedmoor that's used for deer hunting......is to kill deer. The 120gr bullet does that very well....according to some of my friends & reloaders, & a couple of posters here.
No, the Creedmoor was designed specifically to shoot very high BC bullets out of a short action. A 260 Rem shoots the exact same bullets along with about a half dozen other cartridges. But again, thats purely academic. 6.5 Creedmoor, academically, weren’t designed for deer hunting. They were designed to punch holes in paper a long ways away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Academically speaking, anything less than a 140gr in a Creedmoor is defeating the entire purpose of the round.
K-Mo, I probably read the same articles about the Creedmoor development, i.e. how it was developed for match shooting. I started with the 140 Grain Nosler BT due to those articles, but honestly I wasn't impressed. I decided it wasn't generating enough velocity with the larger bullets to hit hard at 150-200 yards, and I had two lost, well hit bucks to show for it. It may do great in a match...outdo the 308, accurate out to a mile, etc. etc. etc. As you and R6mm both said...there's a big difference between match shooting and hunting in many ways.

If I had a 6.5 CM, I would give the 120 grains a serious look, and if you can find the magic fairy dust RL16, you will like the combo. Or, factory loaded ammo in the 120's is more and more common, and for good reason. That rifle/load combo has accounted for 10 really dead deer, unfortunately creating some dog food out of the front end in the process.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top