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I've always shot 130 grain and been a true believer until recently when a started putting a couple hundred yards between me and my target the 130 grain had me shooting unbelievably high at 300 yards in my 270 my cousin shoots a 270 as well but uses 150 I was about fed up until he told me load a 150 and lo and behold I was in the kill zone :eek: I was shocked at the rise the 130 was having but im glad i figured out the problem before we go after hogs next week now I have to find somebody to pawn the rest of 130's off on!!:whistle:
 

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I've always shot 130 grain and been a true believer until recently when a started putting a couple hundred yards between me and my target the 130 grain had me shooting unbelievably high at 300 yards in my 270 my cousin shoots a 270 as well but uses 150 I was about fed up until he told me load a 150 and lo and behold I was in the kill zone :eek: I was shocked at the rise the 130 was having but im glad i figured out the problem before we go after hogs next week now I have to find somebody to pawn the rest of 130's off on!!:whistle:
Assuming you are serious about this:

Bullets never rise after leaving the barrel...they only fall.

Your line of sight through your scope or open sights & the bullets path are not parallel...they are angular to each other with the gun barrel angling slightly upward relative to the line of sight through your scope.

The fired bullet crosses your line of sight twice...once about 25 yards or so from the muzzle, and again at the range at which you are sighted in, as it falls to earth.

The reason the 150 was in the kill zone and the 150 was high is that the 150 fell out faster than the 130 did at the distance you were sighted in.

The 130 will have less rise at 150 yards and still be on target at 300 yards than the 150 will, but not by much

It's the way you have the gun sighted in, not the bullet rising or not rising.

Fired bullets only fall.

If you want the 130 to be on at 300 yards, sight it in there.
 

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:up:
Assuming you are serious about this:

Bullets never rise after leaving the barrel...they only fall.

Your line of sight through your scope or open sights & the bullets path are not parallel...they are angular to each other with the gun barrel angling slightly upward relative to the line of sight through your scope.

The fired bullet crosses your line of sight twice...once about 25 yards or so from the muzzle, and again at the range at which you are sighted in, as it falls to earth.

The reason the 150 was in the kill zone and the 150 was high is that the 150 fell out faster than the 130 did at the distance you were sighted in.

The 130 will have less rise at 150 yards and still be on target at 300 yards than the 150 will, but not by much

It's the way you have the gun sighted in, not the bullet rising or not rising.

Fired bullets only fall.

If you want the 130 to be on at 300 yards, sight it in there.
Exactly :up:
 

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I read this post when there were no responses and decided to not respond until I saw what others would say. I have had minimal luck trying to explain exterior ballistics to people. Point blank range sometimes seems to be the hardest.

Anyone ever see the Mythbusters where they tested a fired bullet versus a dropped bullet hitting the ground at the same time? Pretty cool episode.
 

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"The fired bullet crosses your line of sight twice...once about 25 yards or so from the muzzle, and again at the range at which you are sighted in, as it falls to earth"

im not sure about this statement, i see what you are saying, but it also defeats your first jest. if it crosses at 25 yards i am assuming it is rising, and then at the point of "sighted in" it is again falling so it crosses your sight path 2x. if the bullet is always dropping as you said, how does it come into your sight at 25 yards, then it contiues to fall until it crosses your path again?? doesnt add up. if its dropping instantly why does it cross your line of sight 2x?? i am of the party that agrees a bullets path is to rise and fall.

i do agree you just need to sight in at 300 with 130 grain solve all your problems, the 130 should shoot flatter in sorts than the 150 gr
 

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" if it crosses at 25 yards i am assuming it is rising, and then at the point of "sighted in" it is again falling so it crosses your sight path 2x. if the bullet is always dropping as you said, how does it come into your sight at 25 yards, then it contiues to fall until it crosses your path again?? doesnt add up. if its dropping instantly why does it cross your line of sight 2x?? i
The rifle bore is pointed up, above your "sight line". The bullet never rises above the line of the bore, never. The bullets path is a parabola. The bore and the line of sight through your scope are not parallel.
 

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"The fired bullet crosses your line of sight twice...once about 25 yards or so from the muzzle, and again at the range at which you are sighted in, as it falls to earth"

im not sure about this statement, i see what you are saying, but it also defeats your first jest. if it crosses at 25 yards i am assuming it is rising, and then at the point of "sighted in" it is again falling so it crosses your sight path 2x. if the bullet is always dropping as you said, how does it come into your sight at 25 yards, then it contiues to fall until it crosses your path again?? doesnt add up. if its dropping instantly why does it cross your line of sight 2x?? i am of the party that agrees a bullets path is to rise and fall.

i do agree you just need to sight in at 300 with 130 grain solve all your problems, the 130 should shoot flatter in sorts than the 150 gr
The bullet is rising because your barrel is pointing up to shoot up to the crosshairs line of sight. Not because the barrel is on a flat plain and the bullet rises when leaving the barrel and then begins to fall when losing momentum. The bullet begins to fall as soon as it leaves the barrel but since the barrel is pointing upwards you think the bullet is rising. At least this is the way I understand it.

I made that explanation as simple as I could...if you can't understand that then I can't help you.
 

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i understood the first time, i have just been told different by many a sniper vets, its why they dont use rests either. you ever watched a trace bullet, i reckon it must just be an optical illusion if a bullets always falling
 

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That gravity thing only allows things to fall unless pointed up. Its like driving your car off a cliff. You wouldn't expect to go up before you fall down. This goes for bullets as well. Scopes are designed to allow you to adjust the amount of rise on your gun to hit your target. Minimul rise in barrel allows for major bullet flight rise. A perfectly paralel barrel will result in no rise. By the way i would not change from the 130's those are tried and true in a .270 they also allow for flatter trajectrory.
 

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I think you are all arguing semantics here. Technically, the bullet is rising because it is pointed in an elevated position. relative to the horizontal. Mule Man stated it correctly. The bullet never rises above the line of the bore. But the bore is pointed above the line of sight.

Every time we sight in a rifle at, say, 100 yards, we are adjusting our scope to a point below the point of aim so that we must raise the barrel to correct for gravity's pull on the bullet which always falls below the line of the bore from the moment it exits the muzzle.

To prove this is easy:

1. Set your rifle in a sturdy vise and pull the bolt. Sight through the barrel and aim the bore at a target.

2. Without moving the gun, adjust the scope to the same point of aim.

3. Place 3 target holders with blank paper on them at 25 yard intervals between the gun and target so that the top edge of the paper is level with the horizontal crosshair.

4. Fire the gun.

Each blank piece of paper will have a bullet hole in them increasingly lower on the paper the farther out they are. The first hole should be about 1.5" below the top edge of the paper because this is the average height of the center of a scope above the centerline of the bore.
 

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i understood the first time, i have just been told different by many a sniper vets, its why they dont use rests either. you ever watched a trace bullet, i reckon it must just be an optical illusion if a bullets always falling
Yes and no. The bullet only moves in the direction it is pointed. If the barrel is pointing up the bullet will increase in elevation until gravity gets the better of it. If the shot is far enough for you to watch the trace, then the barrel has to be pointed high enough to lob the bullet out that far. Imagine throwing a ball -the further you want to throw it the more of an arc you have to put on it. I drew this a few years ago - maybe it will make sense...

White Text Sheet music Music Line
 

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....... I have had minimal luck trying to explain exterior ballistics to people. Point blank range sometimes seems to be the hardest.
........
Try discussing interior ballistics some time! :head::eek::head:

Concerning ext. ballistics, a if you compare a bullet's path with a line that extends STRAIGHT along the bore (where the barrel is pointing, exactly), then it becomes apparent the bullet is FALLING. Even if the bullet is going a but 'up' from what we folks call horizontal, it is still FALLING from the line of the bore.

I'll find some purty pictures that explain this later.... if'n I remember.
Tommy
Tommy
 

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M1Tommy,
Yep, been there before, too. Most people only think if exterior ballistics and are blissfully unaware of interior ballistics and terminal ballistics. It takes all of them to make a round perform. I love the line, "Thisn' here rifle shoots flat like a lazer beam!" Uh, I don't think so. :doh:
 

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M1Tommy,
Yep, been there before, too. Most people only think if exterior ballistics and are blissfully unaware of interior ballistics and terminal ballistics. It takes all of them to make a round perform. I love the line, "Thisn' here rifle shoots flat like a lazer beam!" Uh, I don't think so. :doh:
Well...... maybe a laser beam close to a black hole!
OK, I've read too much sci-fi!

Tommy
 

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Try discussing interior ballistics some time! :head::eek::head:

Concerning ext. ballistics, a if you compare a bullet's path with a line that extends STRAIGHT along the bore (where the barrel is pointing, exactly), then it becomes apparent the bullet is FALLING. Even if the bullet is going a but 'up' from what we folks call horizontal, it is still FALLING from the line of the bore.

I'll find some purty pictures that explain this later.... if'n I remember.
Tommy
Tommy
Correct, but your average shooter is thinking line of sight/the ground..... given that point of reference a bullet does rise to a given point then begin to fall back toward earth......... no one aims with the bore.
 
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